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Telomeres Might Predict Lung Cancer Recurrence

Telomeres are sections of DNA that tell an interesting story about lifespan. Shorter telomeres usually suggest a shorter life -- but new research by a Wilmot lung cancer expert shows that longer telomeres might be a promising biomarker for a recurrence of early stage lung cancer.

Could Cabbage and Broccoli Help in the Fight Against Alzheimer’s?

A new study published in Nature Communications suggests that consuming cruciferous vegetables like cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli may help reduce the levels of the bad tau proteins that accumulate in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients.

4/28/2014 | 0 comments

Blood Test May Provide Early Warning of Alzheimer’s Risk

A new study appearing in Nature Medicine points to a simple blood test that can predict who is at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease before the symptoms of the disease appear.  With this new tool, scientists may be able to develop a new generation of therapies that can head off the disease.

3/10/2014 | 0 comments

Common Antidepressant Eases Agitation in Alzheimer’s Patients

Rochester researchers found that a high dose of a common antidepressant drug (citalopram) significantly reduced agitation in Alzheimer’s patients. Agitation is one of the most common reasons Alzheimer’s patients are moved out of their homes into higher levels of care. 

2/19/2014 | 0 comments

A Good Night’s Sleep Really Does ‘Clear the Mind’

Why do we sleep?  It is a question that has long puzzled scientists and philosophers alike.  While the ancient Greeks saw sleep as a doorway to the divine, scientists and biologists see it as an invitation to be devoured by nocturnal predators.  A new study – appearing today in the journal Science – may provide the answer: when we sleep our brain ‘takes out the trash.’

10/17/2013 | 6 comments

Copper Key Contributor to Alzheimer’s

Copper is ubiquitous in the food supply and drinking water.  In the right amounts, it helps the body perform many important functions.  However, a new study points to the metal’s darker side: too much copper can accumulate in the brain and contribute to the buildup of toxic proteins that cause Alzheimer’s disease.

8/19/2013 | 1 comment