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November 2013

Meds for ADHD, Depression Dangerous in Patients with Heart Rhythm Disorder

Last week, several members of URMC’s Heart Research Follow-up team presented new research at the American Heart Association’s Annual Scientific Sessions in Dallas. Among the findings – medications for ADHD and depression are dangerous in patients with Long QT syndrome, a disorder that makes the heart particularly susceptible to arrhythmias.  

11/26/2013 | 1 comment

Drug May Blunt Neurological Damage Caused by Liver Failure

Individuals with impaired liver function are unable to remove ammonia – a by-product of normal cellular activity – from their bodies fast enough.  This result is a host of neurological problems, including seizures, for which doctors have no effective treatment.  A new study shows that an existing blood pressure drug may be able to prevent the molecular chain reaction in the brain triggered by ammonia. 

11/20/2013 | 1 comment

Arthur Moss Receives Honorary Degree from Hungarian University

On November 15th, Cardiology Professor Arthur J. Moss, M.D. received a Doctor Honoris Causa (honorary Ph.D. doctoral degree) from Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary for his many discoveries in the treatment and prevention of heart disease. 

11/18/2013 | 1 comment

Study Links Menstrual Cycle, Concussion Outcomes in Women

Researchers found that women injured during the two weeks leading up to their period (the premenstrual phase) had a slower recovery and poorer health one month after injury compared to women injured during the two weeks directly after their period or women taking birth control pills.

11/13/2013 | 1 comment

U.S. Health Care: Are We Getting the Best Bang for Our Buck?

A new study out today in the journal JAMA revisits the topic of whether or not the U.S. health care system – which now accounts for almost one-fifth of the nation’s economy – is delivering the best value in terms of health outcomes.  The paper also overturns several widely held beliefs about the factors responsible for growth in health care spending.

11/12/2013 | 2 comments