Research Meetings
November through December 2014


December 1, 2014 ( Monday )

12:00pm - 1:00pm
Department of Biology Donut Talk

Dr. Wei-Xing Zong, Stony Brook University

"Proteotoxic stress in oncogenesis and cancer therapy"

Location:  Hutchison 473

Posted by:  Deborah Lawrence, Biology, 14-Nov-14 10:22am ET


December 3, 2014 ( Wednesday )

12:30pm - 1:30pm
Center for Oral Biology Bagel Talk

Catherine Ovitt, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biomedical Genetics in the Center for Oral Biology

"Maintenance of the Olfactory Epithelium is Dependent on Secretory Support Cells Derived from Ascl3-Expressing Lineage"

Location:  COB Conference Room, KMRB, G-9654

Posted by:  Jan Murphy, Center for Oral Biology, 12-Nov-14 4:19pm ET


4:00pm - 5:00pm
THE Aab CVRI Seminar Series

SPEAKER: Scott J Cameron, M.D., Ph.D. Fellow Cardiology University of Rochester Medical Center

TITLE OF TALK: "Dysregulated Platelets and Infarct Expansion: current treatment regimens really ERK me!"

Location:  CVRI Room A105 - 211 Bailey Road West Henrietta, NY

Posted by:  Jacqueline Velazquez, Cardiovascular Research Institute, 18-Nov-14 8:12am ET


December 4, 2014 ( Thursday )

12:00pm - 1:00pm
Seminar: "Shaping the endoplasmic reticulum in neurons:insights from inherited spastic paraplegias"

Craig D. Blackstone, M.D., Ph.D. Senior Investigator Neurogenics Branch, NINDS, US National Institutes of Health Bethesda, Maryland

Candidate Director, Neuromedicine Institute and Chair, Department of Neuroscience

Location:  Upper Auditorium Rm. #3-7619

Posted by:  Lori DellaPenna, 26-Nov-14 8:53am ET


December 5, 2014 ( Friday )

3:00pm - 4:00pm
Department of Biology EEB Seminar

Dr. Ellen Martinson, University of Rochester

"Microsporidial endochitinase gene recruited as a venom protein in parasitoid wasps"

Location:  Hutchison 316

Posted by:  Deborah Lawrence, Biology, 18-Nov-14 8:15am ET


December 8, 2014 ( Monday )

12:00pm - 1:00pm
Department of Microbiology & Immunology Seminar Series

Eric P. Skaar, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Professor

Director - Host-Pathogen Interactions Division

Dept. of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

" The battle for metal between bacterial pathogens and their vertebrate hosts"

Host: Paul Dunman

Seminar Abstract: All organisms require metals for growth and replication and bacterial pathogens are no exception to this rule. In response to this requirement, vertebrates have evolved to defend against infection through the sequestration of metals in a process that has been termed nutritional immunity. In this seminar I will discuss my laboratory's application of advanced imaging technologies to the study of the host-pathogen interaction in an effort to uncover novel factors involved in the struggle for metal between host and pathogen. https://medschool.vanderbilt.edu/skaar-lab/laboratory-eric-skaar-phd-mph

Location:  Upper Auditorium, Rm 3-7619

Posted by:  Nicole Beaumont, Micro & Immunolgy, 19-Nov-14 1:28pm ET


December 10, 2014 ( Wednesday )

4:00pm - 5:00pm
THE Aab CVRI Seminar Series

SPEAKER: Marc W. Halterman, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Rochester. Dr. Halterman holds additional appointments as an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and faculty member of the Center for Neural Development and Disease

TITLE OF TALK: "Putting the brakes on HIF-1a-dependent transcription through endoproteolytic cleavage"

Location:  CVRI Conf. Room A105 - 211 Bailey Road, West Henrietta, NY

Posted by:  Jacqueline Velazquez, Cardiovascular Research Institute, 25-Sep-14 11:12am ET


December 15, 2014 ( Monday )

12:00pm - 1:00pm
Department of Microbiology & Immunology Seminar Series

Gerlinde Van de Walle, DVM, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Viral Pathogenesis, Baker Institute for Animal Health, Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine

" Explant culture systems: useful tools to study herpesvirus pathogenesis"

Host: Brian Ward

Seminar Abstract: Herpesvirus infections are an important cause of disease in humans and many other animal species, including horses, dogs and cats. Infection occurs via mucosal surfaces of the respiratory and genital tracts or via epithelial surfaces such as the cornea of the eye. Our laboratory focuses on the development of physiologically relevant in vitro models to study herpesvirus pathogenesis. More specifically, we use tissue and organ explant models in which the three-dimensional structures and normal cell-cell contacts are maintained. These explant culture systems closely mimic the in vivo situation and, therefore, are a useful stepping-stone bridging in vitro and in vivo models. These models can be used to study viral replication kinetics and virus-host interactions, as well as to evaluate novel vaccines and antivirals. http://www.vet.cornell.edu/Baker/Research/faculty/gerlindevandewalle.cfm

Location:  K-307 Auditorium, 3-6408

Posted by:  Nicole Beaumont, Micro & Immunolgy, 10-Nov-14 11:24am ET


December 17, 2014 ( Wednesday )

4:00pm - 5:00pm
THE Aab CVRI Seminar Series

SPEAKER: Volkhard Lindner, M.D. Ph.D. Senior Scientist Principal Investigator Maine Medical Center Research Institute (Center for Molecular Medicine) Scarborough, ME

TITLE OF TALK: "Cthrc1, from vascular injury to hormonal regulator"

Cthrc1, from vascular injury to hormonal regulator We discovered Cthrc1 (Collagen triple helix repeat containing-1) in a screen for novel sequences associated with vascular injury and repair. Generation of genetic models and antibody reagents revealed that it is a hormone produced in bone, the pituitary gland and remodeling tissues. It regulates bone mass, body fat, voluntary physical activity and adipocyte differentiation. One of the mechanisms involved appears to be inhibition of Pparγ by Cthrc1, by which it also influences progression of atherosclerosis.

Research Interests

We have identified the novel gene Collagen Triple Helix Repeat Containing-1 (Cthrc1) in a screen for novel genes associated with vascular injury and repair. Expression of Cthrc1 is induced in injured blood vessels. Targeted disruption of the Cthrc1 gene in mice has identified important roles of this gene in vascular remodeling and cardiac performance. In vivo and in vitro data indicate that Cthrc1 can inhibit synthesis of fibrillar collagens type I and III via inhibition of TGF-b (transforming growth factor-beta). Currently the major research efforts in the laboratory are focused on the characterization of the biochemistry and biology of Cthrc1, as well as the evaluation of Chtrc1 as a therapeutic target.

Location:  CVRI Room A105 - 211 Bailey Road West Henrietta, NY

Posted by:  Jacqueline Velazquez, Cardiovascular Research Institute, 13-Nov-14 11:46am ET


December 24, 2014 ( Wednesday )

4:00pm - 5:00pm
NO CVRI Seminar Series

There is NO CVRI Seminar Series scheduled for today - 12/24/14

Posted by:  Jacqueline Velazquez, Cardiovascular Research Institute, 12-Sep-14 3:11pm ET


December 31, 2014 ( Wednesday )

4:00pm - 5:00pm
NO CVRI Seminar Series

There is NO CVRI Seminar Series scheduled for today - 12/31/14

Posted by:  Jacqueline Velazquez, Cardiovascular Research Institute, 12-Sep-14 3:13pm ET

 
 
http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/calendar/index.html