Center for Community Health

Dr. Bernard Guyer Lectureship in Maternal and Child Health

The Center for Community Health is pleased to present the Dr. Bernard Guyer Lectureship in Maternal and Child Healths.

Most recently, our distinguished speaker was Particia O'Campo, PhD, a social epidemiologist and researcher who has been working with inner city communitites for over 20 years, conducting research on the social determinants of health. Stay tuned here for information on upcoming talks.

Tackling Worldwide Health Inequities: Is the evidence failing us?

Patricia O'CampoThe contributing factors to the widening global social and health inequalities are complex, and solutions are slow in coming.  To date, the large body of public health research on inequalities has failed to yield strong evidence to support solutions.  This thought-provoking talk will explore the reasons for this failure, and suggest a way forward to ensure that research and the resulting evidence has a greater impact on reducing health inequities.  It may change the way you think about health inequalities and what it takes to close the gap.

                                                                        RSVP to (585) 224-3054 or e-mail: Donna Drews

Dr. Bernard Guyer

Bernard Guyer, M.D., M.P.H.

Bernard Guyer, M.D., M.P.H. is the Zanvyl Kreiger Professor of Children’s Health in the Department of Population, Reproductive and Family Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. A physician trained in both preventive medicine and pediatrics, Dr. Guyer served for seven years as director of the state MCH program in Massachusetts and five years as a CDC medical epidemiologist with national and international service. He has chaired or been a member of both state and national committees on childhood injury prevention, outreach for prenatal care, infant mortality, and Medicaid.

This lecture is endowed by Brewster C. Doust, M.D., a University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry graduate, in honor of Dr. Guyer’s significant contributions to research in understanding the early origins of disease processes and the life course consequences. It is presented in partnership with the URMC Center for Community Health and the Departments of Medicine, Public Health Sciences, and Pediatrics.