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David H. Smith Center for Vaccine Biology and Immunology
University of Rochester Medical Center
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Honors & News

2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 Archives

  • November 17, 2014

    Getting A Good Look: Researchers Collaborate to Move Biomedical Research Further, Faster

    Four individually accomplished investigators, in four labs, are working toward one goal. The URMC is increasing collaboration among its scientists in order to move biomedical research further, faster. In the process, it's winning support from the National Institutes of Health.

    Deborah J. Fowell, PhD, is very familiar with Leishmania major, a particularly nasty parasite that infects the skin of twelve million people around the world, including more than seven hundred US soldiers who returned from Iraq with Baghdad boil. David J. Topham, PhD, is well known for all things-influenza. MinSoo Kim, PhD, is pretty handy at turning living T-cells different colors with beams of light. And James F. Miller, PhD, likes to sit in on cross-talk between T-cells and the molecules that help push them into action.

  • October 9, 2014

    Researchers Receive $4 Million to Study Common and Costly Cause of Death: Sepsis

    A diverse team of immunologists, engineers and critical care clinicians at the University of Rochester Medical Center received $4 million from the National Institutes of Health to study sepsis, an over-the-top immune response to an infection that leads to organ failure and death in about one third of patients. Beyond administering antibiotics, fluids and other supportive measures, physicians have no specific treatment to stop the syndrome, which is the most expensive condition treated in U.S. hospitals, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  • July 30, 2014

    Closing in on the immune system

    Most of the images that researchers use to help them understand the immune system are essentially snapshots. Despite advances in medical technology, the images don't show much activity, which limits researchers' understanding of how the immune system works.

    "A cell could seem like it's communicating with this other cell, but it's just there," says Deborah Fowell, University of Rochester associate professor of microbiology and immunology. "That really tells us nothing about how they interact in the tissue."

    But a study under way at the UR could lead to new imagining techniques that would allow clinicians to view the immune system in real time — while it's actively responding to an infection or fighting a disease.

  • July 18, 2014

    NIH Awards Team of U of R Scientists $9 Million to Study Immune System in Action

    Since the early days of Kodak, Xerox, and Bausch & Lomb, Rochester-area innovators have been making astounding discoveries in optics and imaging. Researchers at the University of Rochester are beginning a major study that will add to the region's imaging expertise, while also advancing global understanding of how the body's immune system works.

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a five-year, $9 million Research Program Project Grant (PO1) to scientists in the School of Medicine and Dentistry to adapt and develop cutting-edge imaging techniques, allowing them to view the immune system while it is fighting infection and disease.

  • June 23, 2014

    Yelena Lerman Recieves Medical Faculty Council Travel Award

    Yelena Lerman is the recipient of the Medical Faculty Council Travel Award in Basic Science Research for Spring 2014. Yelena is in her sixth year of the Pharamacology PhD program under the mentorship of Dr. Minsoo Kim in the Department of Microbiology & Immunology. Yelena gave an oral and poster presentation of her work on Exacerbated tissue homing of neutrophils during sepsis and TLR2-induced cytokine production are regulated by integrin a3b1 at the American Association of Immunologists (AAI) meeting in May 2014. Her work evaluated the surface expression kinetics of b1 and b3 integrin heterodimers on neutrophils during sepsis in both mice and humans. She showed that only integrin a3b1 is significantly upregulated during sepsis. Previous studies suggested a role for IL-10 as a regulator of the transition from mild sepsis to irreversible septic shock. Thus, sepsis progression could be modulated by altering IL-10 release and α3β1 upregulation.

  • May 15, 2014

    Tara Capece Receives Trainee Poster Award at 2014 AAI Meeting

    Graduate student, Tara Capece received the Trainee Poster Award at the 2014 AAI Immunology Conference for her work, Regulation of the integrin LFA-1 in T cell activation.

    Tara is currently working on LFA-1 in T cell activation and migration in Dr. Minsoo Kim's lab. The Kim lab is focused on understanding how T cells and neutrophils home to and migrate within tissues.

  • May 13, 2014

    Patrick Murphy Receives Trainee Abstract Award at 2014 AAI Meeting

    Graduate student, Patrick Murphy received the Trainee Abstract Award at the 2014 AAI Immunology Conference for his work, Apoptotic cells suppress TNF production by tissue resident macrophages through a CD73-dependent mechanism.

    Patrick is currently working on Purinergic regulation of macrophage inflammatory responses in Dr. Rusty Elliott's lab. The Elliott lab is focused on understanding the signaling pathways that regulate how phagocytes locate and engulf apoptotic cells and how this process impacts the immune system in normal and disease states.

  • May 10, 2014

    Yelena Lerman Receives Trainee Abstract Award at 2014 AAI Meeting

    Graduate student, Yelena Lerman received the Trainee Abstract Award at the 2014 AAI Immunology Conference for her work, Exacerbated tissue homing of neutrophils during sepsis and TLR2-induced cytokine production are regulated by integrin a3b1.

    Yelena currently works in Dr. Minsoo Kim's lab.

  • April 23, 2014

    Young-min Hyun Receives 2014 AAI Early Career Faculty Travel Grant

    Young-min Hyun, a research assistant professor in Minsoo Kim's lab, has received the 2014 AAI Early Career Faculty Travel Grant. Hyun's research focuses on leukocytes migration from blood vessel to inflamed tissue through endothelial cell layer and basement membrane.

  • April 10, 2014

    URMC Researchers Win $3M Influenza Grant

    University of Rochester Medical Center researchers have won a $3 million grant to support influenza research. The award from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases is going to support ongoing research by New York Influenza Center of Excellence, a 7-year-old flu research center led by URMC scientists John Treanor M.D. and David Topham, Ph.D..

    This award is an acknowledgement of the highly productive contributions our center has made to the overall understanding of how the immune response to flu is regulated, Treanor said.

  • April 5, 2014

    Yuexin Xu Receives HHMI Translational Medicine Award

    Yuexin Xu, a graduate student in Minsoo Kim's lab, has received the HHMI translational medicine award at the University of Rochester Annual Poster Competition 2014 for her work Optogenetic control of chemokine receptor signal and T-cell migration.

  • January 12, 2014

    Tara Capece Awarded NIH/NIAID F31 Ruth L. Kirschstein Predoctoral Fellowship

    Tara Capece, MS/MPH was awarded an NIH/NIAID F31 Ruth L. Kirschstein Predoctoral Fellowship for the grant titled: Regulation of the integrin LFA-1 during T cell migration and activation. Tara, a fourth-year doctoral candidate in , Minsoo Kim's lab, was awarded a two and a half year fellowship from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease to investigate how the integrin LFA-1 is modulated by chemokine signals and T cell receptor signals to serve different functions, as the former induces cell migration while the later mediated stable cell-to-cell contact. Answering these questions will provide novel insight for vaccine and immunomodulatory drug design.