Research Faculty

Primary Appointments

James Aquavella, M.D.
Dr. James Aquavella's Lab has organized a group of basic scientists including Geunyoung Yoon, Krystel Huxlin, and Jim Zavislan to evaluate human tear film dynamics and its relationship to clinical dry eye syndrome.

Mina Chung, M.D.
Dr. Chung's Lab has research interests that include inherited retinal diseases and genetic factors contributing to age-related macular degeneration.

Steven E. Feldon, M.D.
Dr. Feldon is an internationally acclaimed clinical and basic scientist. The Feldon Lab studies orbital disease and neuro-ophthalmology.

Lin Gan, Ph.D.
The Gan Lab is focused on identifying genes required for neuron differentiation and survival, investigating the genetic pathways involved in these processes, and developing therapies for blindness and deafness via gene therapy and stem cell replacement.

Matthew D. Gearinger, M.D.
Dr. Gearinger is committed to developing innovative treatments for challenging pediatric cases including amblyopia, pediatric optic nerve disorders and retinopathy of prematurity. As a strong proponent of translational research he is at the forefront of delivering promising new therapies to children through his involvement in trials and nationwide studies.

Holly Hindman, M.D.
Dr. Hindman is involved in cornea research and has a special research interest in corneal wound healing and refractive problems of the eye and has received a National Institutes of Health grant to support these scientific endeavors.

Jennifer Hunter, Ph.D.
Dr. Hunter's Lab has research interests that include mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage and development of non-invasive fluorescence imaging techniques to study retinal function in healthy and diseased eyes.

Krystel Huxlin, Ph.D.
Research in the Huxlin Lab ranges from physiological optics, through cell and molecular biology, to psychophysics and systems-level imaging of visual functions. Our goal is to understand the cellular basis, systems and behavioral correlates of visual plasticity in both damaged and intact adult visual systems.

Amy Kiernan, Ph.D.
Sensory organs are unique structures in the body plan of all multi cellular organisms that allow perception of the environment. The Kiernan Lab uses the power of mouse genetics to understand the fundamental molecular pathways involved in sensory development and disease.

David M. Kleinman, M.D.
Dr. Kleinman's research involves the pharmaceutical treatment of diabetic retinopathy and age related macular degeneration.

Richard Libby, Ph.D.
The Libby Lab is interested in understanding the molecular processes that lead to RGC death in glaucoma and why are RGCs more likely to die in some patients than in others.

Scott M. MacRae, M.D.
Dr. MacRae co-authored the premier text on wavefront sensing, "Customized Corneal Ablation: The Quest for Super Vision," now out in its second volume, "Wavefront Customized Visual Correction: The Quest for Super Vision II." His work includes design of numerous refractive surgical instruments, laser surgery techniques and he holds the patent on a commonly used astigmatism treatment.

William Merigan, Ph.D.
Dr. Merigan's Lab does research that examines the role of retinal ganglion cells in visual perception in the primate (human and macaque).

Geunyoung Yoon, Ph.D.
Research projects in the Advanced Physiological Optics Laboratory have been focusing on optics of the eye. The goals of the projects are to objectively understand optical quality of the eye and to improve visual performance by correcting the optical defects in the eye with various correction methods. The Yoon Lab has been focusing on the optics of the eye.

Secondary Faculty

Charles Duffy, M.D.
Single neuron recordings from awake monkey cerebral cortex have demonstrated the existence of neurons which are specifically activated during the viewing of optic flow fields. Our ongoing studies combine optic flow visual displays with real translational movement of the monkey using a room-sized, motorized sled.

Wayne Knox, Ph.D.
Dr. Knox's research interest include Femtosecond Micromachining and applications in Vision Science, Dispersion Micromanagement in Holey and Photonic Crystal Fibers and Ultra-short pulse lasers to name a few.

Walter Makous, Ph.D.
Current research lies primarily in two disparate areas: collaborations with others (e. g., David Williams and Daphne Bavelier) on visual processes, and also investigation into the relationship between science and the Judeo-Christian Bible.

Gary D. Paige, M.D., Ph.D
Dr. Paige's research involves multisensory Interaction and Adaptive Plasticity in Spatial Localization and Orientation. The sensori-neural processes underlying our abilities to localize, track, and interact with a cluttered environment are crucial attributes of daily life, and are among the most fundamental tasks of the nervous system.

Richard Phipps, Ph.D.
Dr. Phipps has authored or co-authorized over 170 articles, and numerous book chapters and reviews concerning control of normal and malignant B lymphocyte activation, cellular and molecular characterization of fibroblasts as mediators of inflammation, wound healing and fibrosis, Graves' ophthalmology, and platelet biology.

Duje Tadin, Ph.D.
Dr. Tadin's research involves visual processing facing two conflicting demands: integration and segmentation. Current research focuses on functional consequences of these spatial interactions.

David Williams, Ph.D.
The Williams Lab uses psychophysical, anatomical, and imaging techniques to study how the structure of the eye and brain affects visual experience.

James Zavislan, Ph.D.
Dr. Zavislan's research areas include improving the performance of optical imaging systems by modeling and measuring the coherence properties of light returned from objects of interest and adjacent objects not of interest.