Principal Investigator

Lisa A. DeLouise, Ph.D., M.P.D. University of Rochester work Box 697 601 Elmwood Ave Rochester NY 14642 office: MC 6-6823 p 585-275-1810 f 585-273-1346

Honors & News

  • June 4, 2014

    Brian Palmer Wins Two Awards at Toxicology Retreat

    Brian Palmer

    Congratulations to Brian Palmer, a Toxicology graduate student in Lisa DeLouise's lab on winning two awards at the Annual Toxicology Retreat. Brian won the department 'Question" Award given to the student who asks the most insightful questions throughout the year at department seminars and also won the McGregor Award for best poster presentation by a first year graduate student.

  • May 6, 2014

    Quhui (Fiona) Pu Wins the 2014 Charles and Janet Forbes Entrepreneurial Competition

    On May 2, 2014 Fiona Pu and Kyle Fedorchak won first place in the 2014 Charles and Janet Forbes Entrepreneurial Competition. They presented a business plan to commercialize a device that enables the testing of biological membranes including measurements of skin barrier function. This device product concept was developed in collaboration with fellow UR Dermates colleagues, Amanda Chen and Jacob VanderBurgh, while working on their Biomedical Engineering senior design project. Internal product customers were Drs. Beck and DeBenedetto (Dermatology) and the team was supervised by Dr. DeLouise (Dermatology and BME).

  • April 19, 2014

    Jared Fialkoff Wins The President’s Award at UR Undergraduate Symposium

    On April 18, Jared Fialkoff won the highest honor, The President’s Award at the University of Rochester Undergraduate Symposium for his research and oral talk entitled, Gold Nanoparticle (AuNP) siRNA Delivery to Treat Allergic Contact Dermatitis. Jared is a Chemical Engineering undergrad working in Lisa DeLouise's lab.

  • July 30, 2013

    Rochester Has New Big Employers

    Kodak, Bausch and Lomb, and Xerox were without question Rochester's biggest employers for decades. "We're moving from more manufacturing based employment to a more service based employment," Rochester Business Alliance CEO Sandy Parker explained. Even if you look at companies that still employ significant numbers here, like Xerox, they themselves are moving away from manufacturing and more towards being service providers.

    Dr. Lisa DeLouise found a new career at the University of Rochester Medical Center after working at Xerox for 16 years. We thought we were pulled together to have a meeting to hear about investors in our technology, explained DeLouise. And when we were told we were all being laid off, it was a bit of a shock. DeLouise is now an associate professor of dermatology and biomedical engineering.

  • July 5, 2011

    DeLouise and King Publish Article in Virtual Journal of Biological Physics Research

    Lisa DeLouise and Mike King (Cornell) have recently published an article, Continuously perfused microbubble array for 3D tumor spheroid model, in the June 15, 2011 issue of Virtual Journal of Biological Physics Research. The Virtual Journal, which is published by the American Physical Society and the American Institute of Physics in cooperation with numerous other societies and publishers, is an edited compilation of links to articles from participating publishers, covering a focused area of frontier research.

  • September 30, 2008

    When Particles Are So Small That They Seep Right Through Skin

    Scientists are finding that particles that are barely there – tiny objects known as nanoparticles that have found a home in electronics, food containers, sunscreens, and a variety of applications – can breach our most personal protective barrier: The skin.

    The particles under scrutiny by Lisa DeLouise, Ph.D., are almost unfathomably tiny. The particles are less than one five-thousandth the width of a human hair. If the width of that strand of hair were equivalent to the length of a football field, a typical nanoparticle wouldn't even belly up to the one-inch line.

  • September 9, 2008

    Cancer Cells Need Salting Before Cooking

    Korean scientists have used table salt to help them move closer to creating a porous silicon nanobomb that will literally blow up cancerous cells. Thermotherapy - that uses near infra-red (NIR) light to destroy cells - stopped being used in the 1990s, but thanks to new research is making a comeback as a possible alternative to currently available therapies for removing cancerous cells. Recently agents such as carbon nanotubes - that emit heat after irradiation with NIR - have been tried in combination with thermotherapy to kill cancer cells selectively.

    Lisa DeLouise, Ph.D., an expert in porous silicon at the University of Rochester Medical Centre in the US, says 'nanoparticle thermotherapy is an emerging field with great potential for biomedical research'.

  • August 20, 2008

    Sun Damage May Exacerbate Skin Penetration of Nano-sunscreens

    Nanoparticles may penetrate sun damaged skin causing concern about their increasingly widespread use in sunscreens, according to new research. In a paper published in Nano Letters, scientists at the University of Rochester found that quantum dot nanoparticles penetrated UV damaged skin more than non-compromised skin.

Recent Publications