Research Subjects Review Board role provides the chance to learn, lead and share

Margaret Carno, PhD, RN, D, ABSM, PNP

Margaret Carno,
PhD, RN, D, ABSM, PNP

In 2006, Margaret Carno, PhD, RN, D, ABSM, PNP, jumped at the chance to serve as a member of one of four Research Subjects Review Boards (RSRB) at the University of Rochester. Carno, assistant professor of clinical nursing, had long been fascinated by the ethics and regulation surrounding research. Now, as the chair of a newly formed fifth board, she looks forward to leading efforts to protect those involved in research while continuing to learn more about the process.

“I love the ethics aspect and learning about other studies and research going on at the University,” Carno said. “Part of research is knowing how to protect subjects, and this is a great opportunity to be involved with that. By better understanding the RSRB, I can better help my colleagues who are investigators here at the School.”

RSRBs are institutional boards charged with reviewing all research at the University involving humans to ensure ethical standards are met. There were previously four boards, but as research at the University continues to flourish, a fifth biomedical board was created.

“Our role is to look at the studies from the human subjects’ standpoint to be sure that the research follows federal guidelines,” said Carno, who leads a board of five individuals focused on research related to pediatrics, orthopaedics, dermatology, radiology and the emergency department. “The buck stops with us, and we take the responsibility of protecting of human subjects seriously,” she said.

Three of the five RSRBs are chaired by nursing faculty, giving the School a substantial presence. “Faculty interest is high, as is administrative support,” Carno said. “This gets the School out there and lets us be team players in the University research enterprise.”

Carno is embracing her new role, even the more difficult aspects. “Dealing with so many different departments and trying to explain our goal is a challenge. We don’t want to impede research. Not at all. But we will ensure that all the human subjects regulations are met,” she said.

Multimedia in this Issue:

Commencement 2010

reunion slideshow

View a slideshow of the event.

Nursing and medical school students partner to learn teamwork

joint simulation video

View the video.

URMC First in Nation to Implant Heart Failure Device

HeartNet video

Learn more about the device.