Renowned Nutrition Expert to Discuss “Food Politics”

March 03, 2008

Nestle's lecture, like her books, will discuss how "food politics" shape community nutrition.

Noted nutritionist and author Marion Nestle, Ph.D., M.P.H., will tackle some provocative health questions in a special Grand Rounds lecture, "What to Eat: Personal Responsibility vs. Social Responsibility."  The talk will be held 8 to 9 a.m.* Wednesday, March 19, in the Class of ’62 Auditorium at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

Nestle, a professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University, focuses her research on the analysis of scientific, social, cultural and economic factors that influence dietary recommendations and practices. She is the author of Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health (2002) and What to Eat (2006), two award-winning books that help decode the mysterious practices of the food industry – from advertising techniques to supermarkets’ strategic placement practices – and how these tactics can sometimes undermine our better nutritional judgment.

An expert tapped for interviews related to the documentary Super Size Me, and editor of the 1988 Surgeon General’s Report on Nutrition and Health, Nestle aims to educate and inspire Rochester’s pediatric students and community organizations. Her lecture will urge them to find new ways to improve community health through better nutrition.

“Obesity – especially childhood obesity – is rooted deeper than just personal behaviors and choices,” said Stephen Cook, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of Pediatrics at the University of Rochester’s Golisano Children’s Hospital at Strong. “Understanding how and why these food industry decisions and policies are made, as well as how they prime our eating choices, paints a clearer picture of the environmental influences that sometimes work against us.”

Nestle’s visit to the University of Rochester Medical Center is part of a special lecture series sponsored by the Pediatric Links with the Community program (PLC). The program teaches new doctors how to leverage their health expertise outside of the doctor’s office by partnering with local community organizations.

Immediately following, a special reception in the Sarah Flaum Atrium will feature light refreshments, a book signing and a poster presentation featuring work by pediatric residents. Both the lecture and reception are open to the public. To learn more, call PLC program manager Santina Tu at (585) 273-3737, or visit www.plccare.org.

To learn more about Nestle’s books, visit www.foodpolitics.com.

* Please note: this is a new time for this event.

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Becky Jones
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