Award-Winning Video Helps Black Women Cope With Breast Cancer

October 27, 2003

"This will be an effective tool to help educate women about the value of building support systems during a difficult time in their lives"

A breast cancer diagnosis is scary and confusing, especially for African American women who are more likely to die of the disease. The James P. Wilmot Cancer Center recently created a video to help black women cope with the diagnosis, complete treatment and move on with their lives.

The video is called "Step by Step:  Making Your Way Through Breast Cancer Chemotherapy."

“We want all women to survive a breast cancer diagnosis and we work hard to get them through treatment. Breast cancer treatment requires that women and their oncologists discuss the goals of therapy, the side effects of treatment, and what they can expect from each doctor they encounter during treatment,” said Jennifer Griggs, M.D., M.P.H., medical director of the Comprehensive Breast Cancer Program at the Wilmot Cancer Center.

“Sometimes women don’t realize how many areas of support are available to help them through the process. Our video portrays effective doctor-patient communication about the issues faced by women undergoing breast cancer chemotherapy.”

The 10-minute video was a finalist in the Telly Award competition for outstanding quality and impact. The video was produced by the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Media Services Department by  Joel Richter, Steve Fasone, Tim Shea, David Rivaldo and Craig Bellaire.

In New York, approximately 11,300 white and 1,500 African American women get breast cancer each year.  While black women get the disease less often, they are significantly more likely to die from it, a disturbing statistic for women and oncologists.

The video, funded by $129,000 grant from the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, encourages women to reach out for support during treatment – at home, work, neighborhood, church and the medical center.

“This will be an effective tool to help educate women about the value of building support systems during a difficult time in their lives,” said Beverly Brooks-DiPaola, associate director of community education for the breast cancer program.

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For Media Inquiries:
Leslie White
(585) 273-1119
Email Leslie White