Sen. Hillary Clinton to Receive Health Award from School of Nursing

Sen. Clinton to Accept Award at Gala for $13.3 Million School Expansion

March 24, 2004

"Senator Clinton has been a tireless advocate for nurses and the practice of nursing."

The first-ever Nursing Health and Humanity Award, presented by the University of Rochester School of Nursing, will go to Senator Hillary Clinton, who will be in Rochester on Friday, March 26, to speak at the Future of Care Campaign Gala and accept the award.

At the Gala, University executives will unveil plans for the largest expansion in the School of Nursing’s history, dating back to the building of its current location, Helen Wood Hall, in 1926. The School will be constructing a new $7.8 million education wing that will allow a 60% increase in student enrollment. Money also will be raised to incorporate the latest computer technology for education and distance learning, for new faculty positions, and to fund new research and specialty centers within the School. Groundbreaking is expected in October 2004.

Members of the media are welcome to cover the event. The Gala begins at 6:30 p.m., with dinner at 7:30 p.m. and awards, presentations and announcements beginning at 8:30 p.m. The Monroe Golf Club is at 155 Golf Ave. in Pittsford. Tickets sold for $100 and are now sold out.

Several community leaders who already have made gifts to the campaign will attend the Gala. The Gala’s other honored guest will be Loretta C. Ford, Ph.D., dean emeritus of the School of Nursing and world renowned for co-creating the role of Nurse Practitioner, which has changed the way nursing care is delivered. The new wing will be named the Loretta C. Ford Education Wing.

The “Nursing Health and Humanity Award,” selected by the Dean’s Advisory Council, is given to someone who has made significant contributions toward advancing the science of nursing and influencing the professional practice and public image of nursing.

Senator Clinton has voted for and been a co-sponsor of numerous bills and amendments that are helping to train and support nurses. Her work is helping to alleviate the national nursing shortage, which continues to be a major problem within health care in the United States (without major changes, the current shortage of 126,000 nurses is projected to grow to 575,000 by 2008). She was a sponsor of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which is directing money to grants for nursing education and recruitment.

“Senator Clinton has been a tireless advocate for nurses and the practice of nursing,” says Patricia Chiverton, dean of the University of Rochester School of Nursing. “She understands how important it is to address the nursing shortage now, and she understands that investing in nurses and nursing today will help patients, the economy, and health care in general in the very near future. Her leadership makes her the perfect choice for this award.”

Senator Clinton is expected to speak about another new development at the School of Nursing: the Center for Nursing Entrepreneurship. The new center will provide a site for students, faculty, nurses, and health care leaders to develop innovative ways to improve the health of consumers. It also will provide seed funding for ideas on improving patient care and will help create new startup businesses and new jobs.

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