Ambulance dedicated to pediatric patients

25-year-old Monroe, Golisano partnership strengthens

September 30, 2005

In order to serve neonatal and pediatric patients from central western New York better, Monroe Ambulance has provided Golisano Children’s Hospital at Strong with an ambulance dedicated to transporting young patients who need specialized care at the region’s only children’s hospital. The specially equipped ambulance, which began service in early August, is marked with the Golisano Children’s Hospital name and will be dedicated during a noon luncheon Wednesday (Oct. 5) at the hospital.

Robert Swantz, M.D., Director of the Neonatal Transport Program said that the reconfigured ambulance is a fine example of Monroe Ambulance’s longstanding commitment to working with Golisano Children’s Hospital to provide outstanding, state-of-the-art care to neonatal and pediatric patients in our region.

The ambulance has been designed to accommodate a customized pediatric stretcher or a fully-equipped neonatal isolette. Both the location of the stretcher/isolette in the ambulance and the ambulance’s large size, allows room for the full team to work efficiently, safely and comfortably while providing the necessary critical care. In addition, ample space facilitates the use of specialized pediatric/neonatal equipment that is required during transport. (e.g. monitors, ventilator, IV pumps, etc.)

“We can operate, basically, as an intensive care unit on wheels,” said Valerie Cansdale, R.N., Pediatric Transport coordinator and also a nurse leader in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. “The minute our team arrives, we can initiate critical care and continue that care during transport to Golisano Children’s Hospital at Strong.”

The neonatal and pediatric transport teams each consist of a neonatal or pediatric transport nurse, a transport respiratory therapist, neonatologist or pediatric critical care physician when necessary, and a Monroe Ambulance emergency medical technician (Neonatal Transport Team) or a paramedic (Pediatric Transport Team) There is also room for a parent to ride along.

Elise van der Jagt, M.D., MPH, Director of the Pediatric Transport Program, said that Monroe personnel are integral to the transportation team and the care of patients being transported.

“They know the rig and our patients’ needs. They know what equipment is needed, what kind of care is to be given, and what kind of service we wish to provide to our region’s physicians and hospitals,” van der Jagt said.

The ambulance is an enhancement to an already strong partnership with Monroe Ambulance. For 25 years, Monroe Ambulance has been transporting neonatal patients to Golisano Children’s Hospital at the University of Rochester Medical Center. The pediatric transport team began its program in 1995 and has been with Monroe Ambulance continuously for the past 10 years.

In partnership with Monroe Ambulance, the Neonatal and Pediatric Transport Teams go out on about 500 calls a year, bringing pediatric and neonatal patients from hospitals and emergency departments nearby and hours away. The Neonatal Transport Program has formal transfer relationships with hospitals in the region so that premature and/or critically ill newborns are efficiently and safely transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, a 52-bed, Level 4, neonatal facility within Golisano Children’s Hospital.

The dedicated ambulance will be parked at the Golisano Children’s Hospital so that it is immediately available to the transport teams. This should significantly decrease the amount of time for the transport team to be mobilized and improve time to arrive at the referring hospital.

“Whichever crew answers the call will be able to respond directly to the hospital,” said George Glessner, projects manager for Monroe Ambulance.

(Media are invited to view the ambulance and speak to transport experts at 11 a.m Wednesday in the loop in front of the Arthur Kornberg Medical Research Building on Elmwood Avenue. Parking available on site.)

For Media Inquiries:
Heather Hare
(585) 273-2840
Email Heather Hare