URMC Pediatrician Receives Prestigious National Appointment

October 06, 2005

Dr. Jeffrey Kaczorowski

Jeffrey Kaczorowski, M.D., associate professor of Pediatrics at Golisano Children’s Hospital at Strong, has been appointed Principal Investigator of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ new Community Pediatrics Training Initiative.

“It’s an honor to be asked to lead a national initiative like this, especially at this stage in my career,” Kaczorowski said.

Beginning Oct. 1, Kaczorowski, 40, will dedicate 30 percent of his time to developing a model for training residents in community health, supporting established programs and assessing the current status of community pediatrics training nationwide.

The Children’s Agenda, of which Kaczorowski is executive director, will hold a reception to celebrate the appointment at 10:30 a.m. Oct. 25 at the Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., Rochester. The Children’s Agenda is an independent, non-partisan, collaborative organization that promotes objective, research-based positions and mobilizes support for them. Their mission is to improve the health and well-being of children in the greater Rochester community by influencing local policies and practices.

Kaczorowski has been a leader of the Pediatric Links with the Community program since 1996. The Rochester community outreach program seeks to improve children’s health by taking pediatricians out of their offices and into community settings. The program trains residents in the community and requires residents to develop projects to improve children’s health, such as advocating for daily physical education in schools.

“It’s no accident that we’re getting asked to do this. It’s part of the history of this department,” Kaczorowski said. “It’s really about the track record here in Rochester.”

The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry’s commitment to community health stretches back decades before Pediatric Links with the Community. After he became Chair of Pediatrics in 1964, Robert J. Haggerty coined the term “the new morbidity” in reference to biological and social problems that had been outside the topics with which pediatricians were trained to deal. Those problems include violence, education and behavior.

In 1973, Haggerty published Child Health and the Community, which recommended a major shift in pediatric training to helping coordinate community child health services.

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