Ethan David Cohen, Ph.D.

Ethan David Cohen, Ph.D.

Contact Information

University of Rochester Medical Center
School of Medicine and Dentistry
601 Elmwood Ave, Box 693
Rochester, NY 14642

Office: (585) 276-5898
Administrative: (585) 276-4994
Fax: (585) 275-1288

Professional Bio

Dr. Cohen graduated cum laud from Lebanon Valley College before completing both his graduate and postdoctoral research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr. Cohen's research is largely focused on understanding how intercellular signaling directs cardiac morphogenesis and how defect in this signaling contribute to human disease. Congenital heart defects are present in approximately 1% of newborn babies, 10% of stillborn fetuses and responsible for nearly 6% of deaths among children under one year of age. Furthermore heart disease is the leading cause of death among adults in the Western world.

A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying cardiac development will aid in the discovery of new methods to detect and treat congenital heart defects. Moreover since aberrant signaling by embryonic pathways is often associated with disease, this same information will also aid in the discovery of novel treatments for adult cardiomyopathy. Many of these new treatments are likely to involve using stem/progenitor cells to replace damaged cardiac tissues. However our ability to differentiate multi-potent stem cells into functional cardiomyocytes is still limited and further insight into the molecular cues that guide cardiac development will be necessary to reach the full potential of regenerative medicine.

Research Bio

Dr. Cohen graduated cum laud from Lebanon Valley College before completing both his graduate and postdoctoral research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr. Cohen's research is largely focused on understanding how intercellular signaling directs cardiac morphogenesis and how defect in this signaling contribute to human disease. Congenital heart defects are present in approximately 1% of newborn babies, 10% of stillborn fetuses and responsible for nearly 6% of deaths among children under one year of age. Furthermore heart disease is the leading cause of death among adults in the Western world.

A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying cardiac development will aid in the discovery of new methods to detect and treat congenital heart defects. Moreover since aberrant signaling by embryonic pathways is often associated with disease, this same information will also aid in the discovery of novel treatments for adult cardiomyopathy. Many of these new treatments are likely to involve using stem/progenitor cells to replace damaged cardiac tissues. However our ability to differentiate multi-potent stem cells into functional cardiomyocytes is still limited and further insight into the molecular cues that guide cardiac development will be necessary to reach the full potential of regenerative medicine.

Awards & Honors (Local)

American Heart Association Grant-in-Aid Award 2015 - 2107
Holtzer Prize for outstanding postdoctoral research in cell and developmental biology at the University of Prnnsylvaniea | University of Pennsylvania 2008
The Susan Heyner Award for Excellence in Research 2002

Recent Journal Articles

Showing the 5 most recent journal articles. 18 available »

2015 Feb 1
Bisson JA, Mills B, Paul Helt JC, Zwaka TP, Cohen ED. "Wnt5a and Wnt11 inhibit the canonical Wnt pathway and promote cardiac progenitor development via the Caspase-dependent degradation of AKT." Developmental biology. 2015 Feb 1; 398(1):80-96. Epub 2014 Dec 05.
2014 Aug 26
Kadzik RS, Cohen ED, Morley MP, Stewart KM, Lu MM, Morrisey EE. "Wnt ligand/Frizzled 2 receptor signaling regulates tube shape and branch-point formation in the lung through control of epithelial cell shape." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2014 Aug 26; 111(34):12444-9. Epub 2014 Aug 11.
2013
Miller MF, Cohen ED, Baggs JE, Hogenesch JB, Morrisey EE. "High throughput genomic screen identifies multiple factors that promote cooperative Wnt signaling." PloS one. 2013 8(1):e55782. Epub 2013 Jan 31.
2012 Sep 18
Miller MF, Cohen ED, Baggs JE, Lu MM, Hogenesch JB, Morrisey EE. "Wnt ligands signal in a cooperative manner to promote foregut organogenesis." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2012 Sep 18; 109(38):15348-53. Epub 2012 Sep 04.
2012 Jun
Cohen ED, Miller MF, Wang Z, Moon RT, Morrisey EE. "Wnt5a and Wnt11 are essential for second heart field progenitor development." Development. 2012 Jun; 139(11):1931-40.

Current Appointments

Assistant Professor - Department of Medicine, Endocrine/Metabolism (SMD) - Primary
Assistant Professor - Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute

Education

Ph.D. | Biomedical Graduate Studies | University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine2004
PhD | Cell and Molecular Biology | Univ Pennsylvania Sch Medicine2004
BS | Biochemistry | Lebanon Valley College1997