Hocking Lab

Latest News

Denise Hocking Appointed to NIH Study Section

Professor Denise Hocking (Pharmacology & Physiology, BME, RCBU Member) has been appointed to serve a four-year term on the Bioengineering, Technology, and Surgical Sciences (BTSS) Study Section of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Center for Scientific Review (CSR). The BTSS Study Section focuses on the interdisciplinary fields of surgery and bioengineering to develop innovative medical instruments, materials, processes, implants, and devices to diagnose and treat disease and injury.

Within BTSS there is a balance between basic, translational, and clinical research, and application and development of emerging cross-cutting technologies relevant to the cardiac system. The CSR is the portal for NIH grant applications and their review for scientific merit. CSR Study section members review grant applications submitted to the NIH, make recommendations on the applications to the appropriate NIH national advisory council or board, and survey the status of research in their fields of science. (March 2011)

Immunofluorescence imageHocking & Dalecki Research Image Featured on Cover of Tissue Engineering

An immunofluorescence image captured by two-photon microscopy by Carlos Sevilla, has been featured as the cover for the December issue of Tissue Engineering. The image is featured in an article by BME graduate student Carlos Sevilla, co-authored by Dr. Diane Dalecki and Dr. Denise Hocking.

The article entitled, Extracellular Matrix Fibronectin Stimulates the Self-Assembly of Microtissues on Native Collagen Gels, demonstrates a novel role for cell-mediated fibronectin fibrillogenesis in the formation and vertical assembly of microtissues, and provide a novel approach for engineering complex tissue architecture. (December 2010)

Denise Hocking Wins University Dean's Award

Denise Hocking (Pharmacology and Physiology, BME) was recognized with the University Dean's Award for Meritorious Service in Ph.D. Defenses. She was one of four faculty members so honored for their commitment to graduate education. Recognition and presentation of this award occurred at the commencement ceremony of Doctoral degree candidates held on May 15th. (May 2010)

Kelley Garvin Wins Best Student Paper Competition

Kelley Garvin won the Best Student Paper Competition at the 159th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America held in Baltimore, MD from April 19-23. Her invited paper, titled Ultrasound standing wave fields induce endothelial cell sprouting within three-dimensional engineered tissues was recognized as the Best Student Paper in the Biomedical Ultrasound/Bioresponse to Vibration Technical Section. This was the second year in a row that Kelley has won this award. Kelley presented her recent work demonstrating the use of ultrasound standing wave fields to spatially organize cells and induce endothelial cell sprouting in three-dimensional engineered tissues.

Kelley is a graduate student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) and her thesis research is co-advised by Dr. Diane Dalecki and Dr. Denise Hocking. Kelley is also a student member of the Rochester Center for Biomedical Ultrasound (RCBU) and organizer of the Ultrasound Journal Club. Kelley's research is part of a larger, multidisciplinary project, led by Drs. Dalecki and Hocking and funded by the NIH that aims to develop novel ultrasound technologies for the field of tissue engineering. (April 2010)

BME Undergraduate Nicholas Berry Wins Research Award

Nicholas Berry (UR BME class of 2010) was awarded the Professors' Choice Award for Undergraduate Research in Engineering at the UR Undergraduate Research Expo held on April 23, 2010. Nick was awarded this honor for his scientific poster titled, High Frequency Pulse-Echo Ultrasound for Three- Dimensional Engineered Tissue Characterization. In his research, Nick has developed a high-frequency ultrasound system to be used to characterize the biological, structural, and mechanical properties of three-dimensional engineered tissues. Nick has been working on this project for a summer and two semesters. His coauthors on this work are Diane Dalecki, Maria Helguera, and Denise Hocking. (April 2010) 

New Collaboration between the Helguera, Dalecki and Hocking Labs

A new collaboration, funded by the NIH, brings together the expertise of Professor Maria Helguera (Center for Imaging Sciences, RIT), Professor Diane Dalecki (BME, UR), and Professor Denise Hocking (Pharmacology & Physiology, UR). The collaborative effort focuses on developing novel, ultrasound tissue characterization techniques for engineered tissues. This work is part of a larger project, led by Drs. Dalecki and Hocking and funded by the NIH, that aims to develop ultrasound-based technologies for the field of tissue engineering.

Dr. Helguera’s laboratory is devoted to advancing multimodal imaging and materials characterization techniques. Over the years, she has developed a suite of nondestructive, ultrasound-based materials characterization techniques for non-biological materials, such as polymers, ceramics, and layered materials. Through this new collaborative effort, the novel approaches that Dr. Helguera has developed and implemented for ultrasound characterization of non-biological materials will be translated to characterize the biological properties of engineered tissues. We propose to extend and apply high frequency ultrasound-based, tissue characterization techniques to monitor non-invasively biological and structural properties of cells and extracellular matrix proteins within three-dimensional engineered tissues. NIH support for the next two years will allow Dr. Helguera to spend the fall semesters and part of her summers devoted full-time to the research project as a Visiting Scientist in the Dalecki lab at the UR BME department. Drs. Helguera, Dalecki, and Hocking are all members of the Rochester Center for Biomedical Ultrasound. (October 2009)

Drs. Hocking and Dalecki receive NIH funding for summer students

Dr. Denise Hocking and Dr. Diane Dalecki have received funding from the NIH to support the summer research projects and career development of undergraduate and high school students for two years. The funding is in response to American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) initiatives of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). Research areas of student projects focus on studying the effects of ultrasound on cell growth and protein conformation, and novel applications of acoustic radiation force. This work will contribute to a larger, multidisciplinary project, led by Drs. Hocking and Dalecki and funded by the NIH, that aims to develop novel ultrasound technologies for the field of tissue engineering. (June 2009)

Carlos Sevilla was awarded a prestigious NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Individual Pre-doctoral Fellowship. This three-year award will provide funding for Carlos’ thesis research project, titled “Promoting Chronic Wound Healing with Ultrasound and Fibronectin.” In his research, Carlos is investigating the ability of ultrasound to produce conformational changes in the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin that, in turn, stimulate cellular processes important for accelerating soft tissue wound repair. Carlos is a third year graduate student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and his thesis research is co-advised by Dr. Denise Hocking and Dr. Diane Dalecki. Carlos is also a student member of the Rochester Center for Biomedical Ultrasound (RCBU). Carlos' research is part of a larger, multidisciplinary project, led by Drs. Dalecki and Hocking and funded by the NIH, that aims to develop the use of ultrasound for chronic wound therapy. (June 2009)

Kelley Garvin Wins Best Student Paper Competition

Kelley Garvin won the Best Student Paper Competition at the 157th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America held in Portland, OR from May 18-22. Her paper, titled “Ultrasound standing wave fields control the spatial distribution of cells and protein in three-dimensional engineered tissue,” was recognized as the best student paper in the Biomedical Ultrasound / Bioresponse to Vibration Technical Section. Kelley presented her recent work demonstrating the use of ultrasound fields to non-invasively control the spatial locations of cells in collagen-based engineered tissues. Ultrasound standing wave fields were used to organize cells into planar bands within collagen gels, resulting in a significant two-fold increase in cell-mediated gel contraction, suggesting that ultrasound-induced cell organization leads to a differential extracellular matrix remodeling. Further, using ultrasound to spatially band endothelial cells within collagen gels resulted in vessel sprouting. These novel technologies have important applications to the fabrication of engineered tissues with desired tissue characteristics. Kelley is a third year graduate student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and her thesis research is co-advised by Dr. Diane Dalecki and Dr. Denise C. Hocking. Kelley is also a student member of the Rochester Center for Biomedical Ultrasound (RCBU). Kelley’s research is part of a larger, multidisciplinary project, led by Drs. Dalecki and Hocking and funded by the NIH, that aims to develop novel ultrasound technologies for the field of tissue engineering. (June 2009)

Candace Gildner Awarded NIH Predoctoral Fellowship

Candace Gildner, an MD/PhD student in the Biomedical Engineering Department, was recently been awarded a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award for Individual MD/PHD Fellows from the NIH. This prestigious, four-year award covers her PhD research as well as her remaining two years in medical school. The overall goal of this project is to determine how chronic exposure to cigarette smoke affects extracellular matrix remodeling in the lung. Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for the development of several non-neoplastic lung disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary hypertension, and interstitial lung disease. Candace's research will focus on whether chronic exposure to tobacco smoke hinders normal tissue repair by altering the ability of cells to polymerize a fibronectin matrix. Her studies will provide insight into factors that regulate the deposition, conformation and physiologic properties of extracellular matrix fibronectin and determine if these factors are localized to lung tissue in response to cigarette smoke. Candace was born and raised in Rochester, NY. She graduated from the University of Rochester with a BS in Mechanical Engineering and completed a MS thesis in Biomedical Engineering at UR. She is currently in her fourth year as a PhD student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, working under the direction of Dr. Denise C. Hocking.

 

Contact Us

Denise C. Hocking, Ph.D.
University of Rochester
School of Medicine and Dentistry
Box 711
601 Elmwood Avenue
Rochester, NY 14642

Telephone: 585-273-1770
Fax: 585-273-2652

Denise_Hocking@
urmc.rochester.edu