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Telomeres Might Predict Lung Cancer Recurrence

Telomeres are sections of DNA that tell an interesting story about lifespan. Shorter telomeres usually suggest a shorter life -- but new research by a Wilmot lung cancer expert shows that longer telomeres might be a promising biomarker for a recurrence of early stage lung cancer.

Musculoskeletal Research Symposium A Huge Success

A whopping 76 posters, representing the research of graduate students and post-docs in the Center for Musculoskeletal Research (CMSR), filled the Flaum Atrium on September 18 as part of the Third Annual CMSR Scientific Symposium.  The day-long event also featured oral presentations by graduate students, post-docs, and faculty on a wide range of research related to the biology and pathology of muscle, cartilage and bone.

9/23/2013 | 0 comments

Can Your Personality Predict How Often You Visit the Emergency Room?

The answer is yes, according to a new study out today in the Milbank Quarterly.  In fact, where older adults rank in the “big five” personality traits correlates to how frequently they use a range of additional expensive health services such as hospital stays, hospital-based rehabilitation, and skilled nursing home care.

9/20/2013 | 0 comments

Tobacco Smoke Mimics Jet Lag, Study Confirms

We all know that traveling to different time zones or working the night shift shakes up our body clocks. A new URMC study also shows that tobacco smoke can harm circadian rhythms, by changing gene expression patterns in lung tissue. 

9/12/2013 | 0 comments

Lab Pinpoints New Drug Target for Infant Leukemia

Although many childhood leukemias are curable, one type – known as 11q23 infant leukemia – has a poor survival rate and requires intensive treatment with life-threatening side effects. In an early-edition article in Blood, the URMC shows it discovered a gene that could provide a new target for therapy.

9/10/2013 | 1 comment

Study Reveals Reasons for Calls to Wilmot Cancer Center

If you’re being treated for cancer and experiencing symptoms, what would cause you to pick up the phone and call your cancer center? Pain emerged as the number one reason, in a study of 563 patients, who reported 2,378 symptoms during 1,229 phone calls to the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center.

9/10/2013 | 1 comment