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Chris Goodwin Successfully Defends His Thesis

Thursday, August 1, 2019

Hilf and Hayes

 

On July 29, Chris Goodwin successfully defended his thesis, “The intersection of Human Cytomegalovirus infection and innate immune signaling”, thereby obtaining his Ph.D. Chris found that the cellular IKK kinases limit the ability of Human Cytomegalovirus to initiate infection. Further, he found that the Human Cytomegalovirus UL26 protein prevents IKKB from inducing the expression of anti-viral interferon stimulated genes. Chris’ work sheds new light on the measures and counter-measures taken by viruses and host cells to try to control the outcome of infection. Chris was mentored by Joshua Munger, and was awarded the Fred Sherman Biochemistry Award, the URBest Sharing Science Video Communication Award, and the Biochemistry Student Seminar Award. Good luck as you embark on your independent career Chris!

T32 Trainee Brandon Berry Writes on Criticism and Confidence in Graduate Studies

Wednesday, July 24, 2019

Brandon Berry, a Ph.D. Student in the Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology Ph.D. program, and an appointee to the NIH T32 Training Grant in Cellular, Biochemical, and Molecular Sciences, wrote an insightful essay on "Balancing Criticism and Confidence” in graduate school, which was posted on the Career Stories@URBest website. The essay can be found here: https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/education/graduate/ur-best-blog/july-2019-1/balancing-criticism-and-confidence.aspx.

Congratulations Dalia Ghoneim!

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Dalia

On July 19, Dalia Ghoneim earned her Ph.D. for successfully defending her thesis, “New functions for RNA elucidated by evolutionary conservation.”  She demonstrated that adjacent pairs of codons known to inhibit protein expression and to slow translation in yeast are conserved, rather than avoided. Genes with these conserved codon pairs exhibit altered translation properties.  Thus, conservation is evidence that these codon pairs serve a function in yeast, although that function is yet to be determined.  Additionally, in collaboration with Xin Li’s lab, Dalia scanned mouse sperm transcriptome data using a machine learning method to identify sets of long-non-coding RNAs with conserved structures. Dalia was mentored by David H. Mathews and Beth Grayhack.  During her studies, Dalia was awarded the prestigious Perricone MD Born Seekers fellowship.  We wish Dalia all the best for her post-doctoral career!

Dalia defense

Professor Russell Hilf Receives Recognition for 50 Years of Service to the University

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Professor Russ Hilf celebrated 50 years of service at the University of Rochester Medical Center on June 19th, 2019, by presenting an overview of his life, career and scientific accomplishments. He was also presented with a plaque commemorating his 50 years of service to the University from the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Dr. Hilf’s first appointment, as an Associate Professor, began July 1, 1969. 

Hilf and Hayes

Dr. Hilf receives the commemorative plaque from Jeff Hayes, Chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.

Lynne Maquat Interviewed at the RNA Symposium at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Monday, June 17, 2019

Harold Smith Featured on Roc NORML Radio

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

So what exactly happens inside your body when you consume Cannabis? Dr. Smith outlines the powerful role of the Endocannabinoid System in modulating human health, and discusses the future of Cannabis research and testing.

Read More: Harold Smith Featured on Roc NORML Radio

Congratulations Dalia Ghoneim for winning a Born Seekers Fellowship

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Dalia

The Born Seekers fellowship is a speech contest that is open to women in STEM. The work they do pushes boundaries and meaningfully impacts society on a local, national, and often global level. The women selected as our 2019 Born Seekers build skills in communication and leadership, serving as role models for the next generation of scientists, engineers, doctors, and STEM professionals.

Dalia Ghoneim is a PhD candidate in Genetics at the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY. She develops and contributes to software that helps us understand the structure and functions of genetic molecules, and has worked to analyze mutations in DNA from patients with severe neurological diseases like epilepsy and autism. This work was instrumental to identifying new genes that cause these diseases. Dalia takes as many opportunities as she can to share science with others by participating in outreach and advocating for inclusion in science. Outside of science, Dalia is a single mother to four wonderful children, a competitive runner, and enjoys figure drawing and learning and experiencing new things.

31st Annual Genetics Day Symposium

Monday, April 22, 2019

The Departments of Biomedical Genetics and Biology, with the support of the University Committee for Interdisciplinary Studies, host the 31st annual Genetics Day Symposium on Thursday, April 25, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Class of ’62 Auditorium and Flaum Atrium. This year’s Fred Sherman Lecturer will be Phillip Zamore, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and professor of biomedical sciences at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, giving a talk titled “piRNAs and the Struggle to Reproduce.”

Read More: 31st Annual Genetics Day Symposium

Byron Rubin, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, pens article in ASBMB TODAY

Monday, February 18, 2019

Dr. Rubin describes his own battle with prostate cancer, and how as a scientist how he took control of his own treatment. He also describes the impact of personalized medicine on his medical decisions and how he deals with living with cancer. Read the article.

Former Biochemistry Student Jerry Madukwe, Ph.D. travels to West Africa to Speak With Students

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Jerry with students

Jerry Madukwe, Ph.D., who received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry (2018), and is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University, recently completed a 2-week science-outreach trip to West Africa. Jerry was invited by the West Africa Center for Cell Biology of Infectious Pathogens at the University of Ghana, and the Department of Life sciences at the University of Ilorin in central Nigeria to talk about the work he did as a PhD student and about graduate school in the United States. Jerry, who hails from Nigeria, and got his BS from Lee University in Tennessee, also used the opportunity to visit his former elementary school where he talked to fifth grade pupils about science (see photos), and to demonstrate DNA extraction from bananas. The kids were very excited by his visit, and Jerry found the experience very fulfilling.

Jerry in front of school

Jerry with students 2