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Sugar and Cancer: Wilmot Registered Dietitians Weigh In on What You Should Know

Sugar and Cancer: Wilmot Registered Dietitians Weigh In on What You Should Know

Sugar. It’s a topic that often comes up when discussing diet, particularly for those concerned about cancer. Some may wonder about the impact of eliminating sugar when it comes to cancer risk, but unfortunately, it’s not a simple answer because healthy cells need sugar to make energy. Wilmot’s registered dietitians, Sue Czap and Melissa Zahn, help explain the relationship between sugar and cancer.

Brain Cancer Symptoms: When should I see a doctor?

Brain Cancer Symptoms: When should I see a doctor?

Brain cancer is fairly rare compared to other types of cancer, but knowing common symptoms of the disease is important. If you experience these or other symptoms, it's important to tell a medical professional. 

Face-to-Face with a Top Urologist and Wilmot Partner

Face-to-Face with a Top Urologist and Wilmot Partner

Jean Joseph, M.D., M.B.A., is hard to miss on the campus of the University of Rochester Medical Center. At 6 feet, 5 inches tall, the renowned surgeon is often seen striding down corridors in scrubs between cases, busy offering a phone consultation or responding to email. With high-quality technique and skill, Joseph has removed thousands of cancers and taught a generation of surgeons — but he also tries to practice the art of medicine. He calls his patients the night before surgery to answer questions and suggest they get a good night’s sleep. The joke is that they often say, “No, YOU get a good night’s sleep!”

Leveling Up

Leveling Up

Driven by the possibilities of immunotherapy, Peter A. Prieto, M.D., M.P.H., and Minsoo Kim, Ph.D., are working together to find new ways to improve responses to these promising treatments.

A Cornerstone and Catalyst for Hope

A Cornerstone and Catalyst for Hope

Even on the gloomiest days, light streams through the wall of windows in the lobby of the Wilmot Cancer Center. It fills the patient rooms on the building’s upper floors, and it brightens areas on the ground floor that would traditionally lack natural light.