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Chin-To Fong, M.D.
Chin-To Fong, M.D.

Chin-To Fong, M.D.

Pediatrics — Genetics — Pediatrics

Accepting New Patients

Chin-To Fong, M.D.

Pediatrics — Genetics — Pediatrics

Accepting New Patients


Locations

125 Red Creek Drive
Rochester, NY 14623
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phone

Appointments

(585) 275-5857

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Fax

(585) 273-1018

About Me

Dr, Fong provide care for newborns, children, teens, and adults who have genetic and metabolic disorders. He treats a variety of conditions, including birth defects, chromosome abnormalities, cystic fibrosis, developmental disabilities, Fragile X syndrome, Neurofibromatosis, Marfan syndrome, Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome, Skeletal dysplasias and inborn errors of metabolism, including Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) and Phenylketonuria (PKU).

Dr. Fong has extensive experience working in his field and the Chief of Pediatric Genetics.

Dr. Fong admits to:

Strong Memorial Hospital

Credentials

Education:

MD | Harvard Medical School — 1981

Post-doctoral Training & Residency:

Fellowship in Genetics at Washington University School of Medicine — 1984 - 1987
Internship in Pediatrics at St. Louis Children's Hospital — 1981 - 1982
Residency in Pediatrics at St. Louis Children's Hospital — 1982 - 1984

Research

Dr. Fong's primary research interest is Genetics of orofacial clefts. Cleft lip and palate is a common birth defect that affects one in 700 children in the U. S. and around the world. Children with this birth defect face multiple challenges, such as feeding difficulty, hearing impairment, speech defects and many dental abnormalities. These problems, along with the cosmetic changes associated with the clefts, often result in life-long physical, educational and psychological handicaps. Caring of these children thus requires a team approach over long periods of time.

Cleft lip and palate is a familial trait, but the genetic factors that result in this abnormality have not been clearly identified. Recent calculations have led to the belief that as many as a couple dozen genetic factors may act together to cause cleft lip and palate, with a few of the factors being more important than the rest. Moreover, there is convincing evidence that environment factors, such as cigarette smoking by the pregnant mother, play a role in the development of cleft lip and palate in the fetus.

In these situations, the environmental and genetic factors act together to cause the birth defect. Therefore, cleft lip and palate is considered a multifactorial genetic disorder. The work in our laboratory is focused on finding the genetic factors for cleft lip and palate through linkage disequilibrium analyses. We believe that better treatment and prevention of cleft lip and palate will come from a better understanding of these genetic and environmental factors.

Publications:

Yoon YJ, Perkiomaki MR, Tallents RH, Barillas I, Herrera-Guido R, Fong CT, Kyrkanides S. "Transverse craniofacial features and their genetic predisposition in families with nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate." The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association.. 2004 May 0; 41(3):256-61.

Yoon YJ, Perkiomaki MR, Tallents RH, Barillas I, Herrera-Guido R, Fong CT, Kyrkanides S. "Association of nasomaxillary asymmetry in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate and their parents." The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association.. 2003 Sep 0; 40(5):493-7.

Perkiomaki MR, Yoon YJ, Tallents RH, Barillas I, Herrera-Guido R, Moss ME, Fong CT, Kyrkanides S. "Association of distinct craniofacial features in nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate family members." The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association.. 2003 Jul 0; 40(4):397-402.

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