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Tiniest Patients Make Way to New Hospital

Tiniest Patients Make Way to New Hospital

Yesterday was a big day for Golisano Children's Hospital! Many of our tiniest patients in our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) moved over to the new-and-improved Gosnell Family NICU in the new Golisano Children's Hospital building!

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Building donors come in all varieties

Not all of the 120 donors who toured the new Golisano Children's Hospital building are individual donors. Many of them are groups of people who have banded together to raise money and name a space inside the new hospital. Click on the photos below to see if you recognize any friends, neighbors or local media personalities.

If you'd like to get involved with a community group raising funds for the hospital, contact Stephanie Sheets, assistant director of community affairs at Golisano Children's Hospital, at (585) 275-2268 or click here to email her.

To see more photos, click here to check out an album full on Facebook (you don't need a Facebook account to view them).

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Construction Corner: A look inside

Take a look inside the future Golisano Children's Hospital with these interior photos (and a few good external shots)! Featured in our upcoming Strong Kids newsletter, these pictures take you down the corridor of the third floor, otherwise known as the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and up to the seventh floor to the general patient rooms and our expansive Playdeck.

The exterior renderings have really come to life over the last six months and now the interior of the hospital is starting to do the same. Features of the main lobby are becoming easier to pick out, drywall is being laid, bathroom tile is being placed, and foot and head walls are going in.

Explore the building and learn more about naming opportunities and how you can make a difference for the future of sick and injured children, and their families, at the Finger Lakes region's only children's hospital.

Sun Shines on Construction Site for Summer

Blue Sky BuildingThe crane has been taken down. The brick is laid. The windows are in. From the outside, UR Medicine’s new Golisano Children’s Hospital looks almost done. In reality, a lot more work is ongoing inside, and we need the support of our generous community to help us get it done over the next 12 months.
 
As we transition into summer, we love seeing the sun shine on the building with the bright blue sky in its background, showing off its beauty and what it means to so many people.
 
The windows wrapping around the building reflect the sunlight and stand out to visitors and those driving by. These captivating windows are just one of the exciting features of the future two-story playdeck on the 7th and 8th floors that will provide patients and families with a great view, which, on clear days, will reach the hills of the Finger Lakes. Progress on the space will even be visible through the windows for those stopping to imagine what it will all soon become.
 
NICU sunshadesThe building team has also made a lot of progress on the future NICU. The floor is framed and drywalled and the installation of the outside sunshades has begun (as seen in the picture on the right).
 
All of these changes are very exciting and there are so many more to come! Keep up to date by liking the children's hospital's Facebook page and following us on Twitter and Instagram.
 
To find out how you can help support the new hospital, please call Scott Rasmussen at (585) 273-5932.
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Baby Girl Overcomes Multiple Medical Obstacles

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An ovarian cancer survivor, Krystle Ellis didn’t think she was ever going to be able to have a baby. For her and her husband, Ricardo, the world changed, when they got the news in February 2012 that Krystle was pregnant. While the Brighton couple firmly believed the pregnancy was a miracle, they had no idea about the journey they had yet to face.
 
From her first ultrasound at UR Medicine’s Strong Memorial Hospital, Krystle knew something was wrong. The scan showed that baby Brooke’s neck was hyper-extended and her brain and musculoskeletal system weren’t developing correctly. Krystle also had a uterine fibroid tumor that was sitting on top of Brooke’s head, taking up most of her space in the womb.
 
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