Skip to main content
Explore URMC

SMD Logo

menu

Elective Course Descriptions

Fall 2017

BIO 402 - MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (4)

This course deals with the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication, DNA repair, transcription, translation, and control of gene expression. We will also discuss cell cycle regulation, programmed cell death, molecular basis of cancer, and modern molecular biology techniques. Emphasis will be given to mammalian systems and molecular mechanisms of human diseases.

BPH 592 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOPHYSICS - MATH FOR MOLECULAR BIOPHYSICS

Periodic motion, waves, Fourier Series and complex representation, partial differential equations, waves, scattering, vector analysis, Fourier transforms, delta functions, electromagnetism, Maxwell's equations, forces, analysis of molecular structure, Least squares fitting, cat scans, back Projection, spin, angular momentum, magnetic moment, MRI, laboratory statistics.

CHM 423 - NMR SPECTROSCOPY (2)

(Formerly CHM 422) An introduction to NMR spectroscopy. Collection, processing, and interpretation of homonuclear and heteronuclear 1D and multidimensional spectra will be covered. Topics to be discussed include chemical shifts, relaxation, and exchange phenomena. Examples from organic, inorganic, and biological chemistry will be used. (Fall, 1st half of semester).

CHM 451 - QUANTUM CHEMISTRY I (4)

Basic quantum chemistry, Schroedinger equation, basic postulates of quantum mechanics, angular momentum, perturbation theory, and molecular structure.

CHM 469 - Computational Chemistry (4)

 

MBI 473 - IMMUNOLOGY (3)

Innate and adaptive immunity; structure and genetics of immunoglobulin’s and T cell receptors; lymphocyte development, immune regulation, immunological diseases, tumor immunity. Three Exams.

NSC 512 - CELLULAR NEUROSCIENCE (5)         

This is a comprehensive course covering a broad range of topics: identification and characterization of cellular components of the nervous system; electrical properties of neurons; development of membrane potentials and signal propagation; molecular properties of ion channels and their role in neuronal signaling; organization of the nervous system; regional neuroanatomy of brain, brain stem, and spinal cord; anatomy of sensory, motor, and regulatory systems; synaptic receptors and channels: signal transduction; modulation of synapses and simple memory mechanisms; biochemical and pharmacological properties of synaptic receptors; neurotransmitter synthesis and transport; excitatory and inhibitory amino acids; development of the nervous system and genesis of neurons and glia; neurotrophic factors and neuronal migration; axonal path-finding; and plasticity and synaptic rearrangement.

PHP 403 - HUMAN CELL PHYSIOLOGY (4)

This course is aimed at providing an introduction to the fundamental principles of modern cell physiology; the implications of cellular and molecular principles for the integrated physiological responses of intact organs and tissues, in both healthy and diseased states, will be discussed. The material will include basic concepts, principal research questions, and common methodologies - emphasis will be on a quantitative approach wherever possible. Course content will particularly focus on basic cellular physiology, including excitable cell physiology, and will emphasize intercellular interactions and responses to their tissue and organ environment. Recent literature relevant to the material will be reviewed and analyzed during the course

Spring 2018

BCH 412 - ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES (5)

An advanced biochemistry lecture course intended for senior undergraduate and graduate students. Topics include DNA structure, RNA structure and catalysis, nucleic acid-protein interactions, x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, protein folding, molecular chaperones, membrane proteins, post-translational modifications of proteins, ATPases, G protein and function, protein-protein interactions, proteases and cascade reaction pathways.

BME 442 - MICROBIOMECHANICS (2)

This course covers the application of mechanical principles to biotechnology and to understanding life at its smallest scales. Topics will vary with each course offering. Sample topics include force generation by protein polymerization, the mechanisms of bacterial motion, and the separation of biological molecules in porous media.

CHM 414 - BIOLOGICAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4)

Discussion of the role of metal ions in biological systems, especially enzymes. Uptake and regulation of metals, common spectroscopic techniques used for studying metals, and mechanisms through which they react. Other topics include metal ion toxicity, metal-based drugs, and interaction of metals with nucleic acids. Problem sets and proposal.

CHM 416 - X-RAY CRYSTALLOGRAPHY (2)

Students will learn the basic principles of X-ray diffraction, symmetry, and space groups. Students will also experience the single crystal diffraction experiment, which includes crystal mounting, data collection, structure solution and refinement, and the reporting of crystallographic data. Weekly assignments: problem sets, simple lab work, or computer work. (2nd half of semester).

CHM 440 - BIOORGANIC CHEMISTRY & CHEMICAL BIOLOGY (4) (even numbered years)

(Formerly CHM 437) An introduction to bioorganic chemistry and chemical biology. The course will present a survey of how the principles of organic chemistry have been applied to understand and exploit biological phenomena and address fundamental questions in life sciences. The course is primarily based upon the primary literature. Covered topics include the design and mechanism of enzyme mimics and small molecule catalysts (organocatalysts), synthesis and chemical modification of biomolecules (oligonucleotides, proteins, oligosaccharides), design and application of oligonucleotide and peptide mimetics, and chemical approaches to proteomic and genetic analyses. Not open to freshmen and sophomores.

IND 443 - EUKARYOTIC GENE REGULATION (4)

This advanced course examines mechanisms of chromatin-mediated regulation of gene expression, relating molecular structures, dynamic interactions, nuclear processes, 3-D nuclear organization to biological functions. Topics include DNA structures, packaging and higher order chromatin organization in the nucleus, the transcription machinery, eukaryotic chromosome structure and its modifications, epigenetics and functional genomics, dynamics of nuclear processes, nuclear reprogramming, development and applications of genome manipulation technology. Lectures and readings draw heavily on primary literature both classic and most recent.

IND 447 - SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION (4)

Cellular signal transduction is one of the most widely studied topics in the biomedical sciences. It has become clear that cells have multiple mechanisms for sensing the environment and converting the external signals into intracellular responses. The goal of this course will be for students to learn modern concepts in signal transduction. The lectures will cover a spectrum of topics ranging from basic principles and mechanisms of signal transduction to contemporary techniques for doing research in this area.