Skip to main content

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Visitor Restrictions, Resources, and Updates

Explore URMC
menu

News

20202019201820172016

Deborah Ossip Interviewed 

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

In August, 2015, Deborah Ossip, Ph.D., Director of the URMC Smoking Research Program, appeared on multiple news outlets, including Good Day Rochester, MedPage Today (8/18/15 and 10/2/15) to talk about a recent e-cigarette study published in JAMA that links teen use of e-cigarettes with future cigarette use.  Dr. Ossip is also President Elect for the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco and Associate Editor of the Journal of Smoking Cessation.

Brittany Baisch, PhD ’13 Wins Nanotoxicology Specialty Section Best Publication 2015 Award

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Former Toxicology graduate student in Alison Elder's lab, Brittany Baisch (PhD ’13) won the Nanotoxicology Specialty Section Best Publication 2015 Award at the Society of Toxicology (SOT) annual meeting in San Diego, CA. last week. She won the award for the paper, Equivalent titanium dioxide nanoparticle deposition by intratracheal instillation and whole body inhalation: the effect of dose rate on acute respiratory tract inflammation. Brittany is currently working as a toxicologist at Kraft Foods.

UR Toxicology Graduate Students Make Strong Showing at 2015 SOT Meeting

Friday, April 3, 2015

Dr. Alison Elder and Elissa Wong

Dr. Alison Elder and Elissa Wong

UR Toxicology graduate students made a strong showing at the Society of Toxicology (SOT) annual meeting in San Diego, CA. last week. 3rd year graduate student, Elissa Wong (Majewska Lab) and 5th year graduate student, Sage Begolly (O'Banion/Olschowka Labs) both won travel awards to attend and present their posters.

Elissa Wong and Dr. Alison Elder also attended the event, hosting the UR recruitment table at the Society of Toxicology (SOT) Committee on Diversity Initiatives (CDI) session. Congrats to all!

View all of the photos from the SOT meeting.

E-Cigarette Vapors, Flavorings, Trigger Lung Cell Stress

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Do electronic cigarettes help people quit smoking? As the debate continues on that point, a new University of Rochester study suggests that e-cigarettes are likely a toxic replacement for tobacco products.

Emissions from e-cigarette aerosols and flavorings damage lung cells by creating harmful free radicals and inflammation in lung tissue, according to the UR study published in the journal PLOS ONE. Irfan Rahman, Ph.D., professor of Environmental Medicine at the UR School of Medicine and Dentistry, led the research, which adds to a growing body of scientific data that points to dangers of e-cigarettes and vaping.

Please view the NBC news video about this article.

Read More: E-Cigarette Vapors, Flavorings, Trigger Lung Cell Stress

E-cigarette Vapors Can Damage Lung Cells

Monday, February 9, 2015

A new study by University of Rochester suggests that e-cigarettes are likely to be a toxic replacement for tobacco products.

Emissions from e-cigarette aerosols and flavourings damage lung cells by creating harmful free radicals and inflammation in lung tissue. Several leading medical groups, organizations and scientists are concerned about the lack of restrictions and regulations for e-cigarettes, said Irfan Rahman, lead author and professor of environmental medicine at University of Rochester Medical Center.