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URMC / Center for Health + Technology / The Future of Clinical Trials

The Future of Clinical Trials

New technologies are rapidly reshaping health care

However, the effect of new technologies on drug development to date has been limited. Increased use of new tools and approaches in future clinical trials can enhance the design, improve the assessment, and engage participants in the evaluation of novel therapies for neurologic disorders.

Predictive disease modelingPredictive Disease Modeling + Simulation

Challenge

Characterizing the long-term progression of Parkinson disease [PD] and the rate of that clinical progression are among the highest clinical research priorities of the National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke.

Opportunity

Longitudinal data from clinical trials and observational studies can be used to build quantitative disease progression models to better understand and predict disease trajectories, both in the absence and presence of pharmacologic treatment(s).

Impact

For chronic progressive diseases like PD, a more precise understanding of the changes in disease course as it relates to treatment effects and patient-level factors would help in the design and efficiency of clinical trials.

Collaborators + Partners

University at Buffalo, IBM, LPA Solutions, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

Featured Publication

Virtual visitsVirtual Visits + Studies

Challenge

As the global burden of Parkinson disease increases, access to care will likely be more restricted by distance, disability, and the distribution of specialists.

Opportunity

Technology-enabled solutions are a powerful tool to ensure that individuals with a highly treatable condition can access care.

Impact

We seek to enable anyone, anywhere to receive care, participate in research, and benefit from the resulting advances.

Collaborators + Partners

23andMe, AMC Health, Davis Phinney Foundation, Edmond J. Safra Foundation, Greater Rochester Health Foundation, Johns Hopkins University, Parkinson's Foundation, NINDS, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, University of Pennsylvania

Featured Publications

Smartphones + DevicesSmartphones + Devices

Challenge

Most clinical data on Parkinson disease and Huntington disease is episodic and recorded during infrequent visits at research centers.

Opportunity

High-frequency data can be collected through specially designed smartphone applications. Using the app, the patient performs specific movement tasks at regular intervals (active data monitoring), or the app collects data in the background as patients use their phones (passive data monitoring).

Impact

Passive and active data monitoring will contribute to our understanding of day-to-day fluctuations in patient symptoms and how disease affects individuals in the real world.

Collaborators + Partners

Apple, Aston University (UK), Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Johns Hopkins University, Massachusetts General Hospital, NINDS, Sage Bionetworks

Featured Publication

Sensors + WearablesSensors + Wearables

Challenge

Parkinson disease and Huntington disease are chronic neurodegenerative conditions with symptoms that have external manifestations that are difficult to monitor during infrequent visits at research centers.

Opportunity

Wearable sensors can capture frequent and objective measurements that could detect medication effects, or the quantification of previously unobserved symptoms in-clinic.

Impact

This data advances the clinical understanding of Parkinson disease and Huntington disease, provide new insight into the daily variability of motor symptoms in real-world settings.

Collaborators + Partners

Auspex/Teva, BioSensics, Great Lakes Neurotechnology, MC10
 


Featured Publications