Principal Investigators

Michael Richards, Ph.D. University of Rochester work 601 Elmwood Ave Rochester NY 14642 office: MC 2-6321 p (585) 273-1745
Karl Quentin Schwarz, M.D. University of Rochester work Box 679-E 601 Elmwood Ave Rochester NY 14642 office: MC G-0379 p (585) 275-8218
Michael C. Stoner, M.D. University of Rochester work Rochester NY

Lab Alumni

Photo of Akshay Rao
Akshay Rao

Visiting Student in Residence (Rochester Institute of Technology), 2013 – 2015

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Joseph Featherall, B.S.

Mechanical Engineer, currently attending a Postbaccalaureate Premedical Program at Columbia University

Bio

Joseph Featherall is a Mechanical Engineer, currently attending a Postbaccalaureate Premedical Program at Columbia University. Mr. Featherall received his Bachelor of Science from Rochester Institute of Technology in 2011. His interest in Medical education came from experiences he gained through a Volunteer program in Primary Care he undertook at the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education in Scranton, PA.

During 2008 and 2009, Mr. Featherall led the design team which built the hemodynamic simulator currently being used in the lab to test and rupture aneurysm models. From July 9, 2012 to August 24, 2012, Mr. Featherall worked with Dr. Ankur Chandra in the Cardiovascular Engineering lab, managing lab projects, coordinating Engineering students and working on computational modeling of aortic and stent-graft structural mechanics and fluid dynamics using several programs.

During his time within the lab, Mr. Featherall also spent a significant amount of time identifying and applying to possible funding opportunities and collaborative partners. Mr. Featherall has applied for a Tech Transfer grant in order to bring the AV Fistula technology onto the market.

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Geni Gianotti

Biomedical Engineering student at Rochester Institute of Technology

Bio

Geni Gianotti is a third year Biomedical Engineering student at Rochester Institute of Technology. During Summer 2012, before entering the third year of her undergraduate degree, Ms. Gianotti worked as a co-op student in the Cardiovascular Engineering lab under Dr. Karl Schwarz. Ms. Gianotti began in the lab on May 29, 2012, and ended her co-op on August 10, 2012. She worked on the Contrast Fragility project with Dr. Schwarz where her main focus was the Echo Contrast Fragility project. Ms. Gianotti’s research focused on improving the limited quality of cardiac ultrasound imaging. Her main duties in this project involved using 2D imaging to decipher the effectiveness of using echo contrast agents composed of gas filled micro-bubbles. These are fragile agents, and Ms. Gianotti worked with a 2D imaging Vividi machine, and a generic flow system consisting of: a pump, flow meter, ultrasound exposure chamber, imaging chamber, laser, Canon EOS camera, a reservoir, PWD (Pulsed Wave Doppler), and a resistor, to determine the time taken to destroy a bolus of echo contrast with different ultrasound exposure intensities.

Ms. Giannoti conducted her experiments at RIT in the Laser lab of Dr. Steven Day. The processing and analysis of her data was carried out at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Following exceptional work with this project, Ms. Gianotti is considering a longer partnership with the lab, continuing throughout her school year.

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Mallory Wingate

Biomedical Engineering student at Rochester Institute of Technology

Bio

Mallory Wingate is a second year Biomedical Engineering student at Rochester Institute of Technology. Prior to entering the second year of her undergraduate degree, Ms. Wingate worked in the Cardiovascular Engineering lab as a Research Assistant during her 2012 Summer vacation. Between May and August 2012, Ms. Wingate worked closely with Dr. Ankur Chandra and Medical student Doran Mix, on the Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm project. Ms. Wingate’s main duties and focuses in this project included creating a 3D image from a CT scan using image segmentation, printing a 3D model of this image, and then using this to create molds. The molds were then used to create a patient-specific model of an aorta, containing an aneurysm made from hydrogel, a material which mimics the properties of human vessels very closely. Ms Wingate was then able to attach the models to a hemodynamic simulator and pulsate them, using physiologic pressure.

The models are used to see when, and where, rupture occurs. Ms. Wngate also recorded the stress and strain data from the aneurysm using ultrasound. These models are able to provide data about stress and rupture patterns in vessels before and after repair.

Recent Publications