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Good for the Heart, Good for the Brain

If you do a lot of sitting and get little physical exercise, you are naturally at risk for cardiovascular disease, especially if you are over 55. New research shows that within six months of participating in a commonsense, aerobic exercise program you will experience improved cognitive functions—meaning better brain health. These include increased attention span, the ability to stay focused, better decision-making, improved working memory, better planning, and the ability to think with more agility—switching back and forth between tasks you’re doing. You have even better returns if you follow a diet of vegetables, fruits, low-fat dairy foods, less salt, and moderate amounts of whole grains, fish, poultry, and nuts.

Do you fear losing your mental capacity as you age? Here’s your mission: Get moving, and remember, what’s good for your heart is good for your brain. (Consult with your medical provider before beginning an exercise program.)

Source: https://scholars.duke.edu/display/pub1250443

The Life-Work Connections Employee Assistance Program is brought to you by Well-U, helping eligible individuals to assess issues, and provide short-term counseling and referrals.

Keith Stein | 1/24/2019

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