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Saying No at Work — with Style

Saying "no" is a strategy for reducing stress, but keeping workplace relationships positive and your reputation as a team player intact are important considerations in your response. Always avoid the terse "no." Attempt to join forces with your requester to find an alternative for the help they need, avoid text or email rejections (go in person to say you aren’t available, if possible), and communicate openly that your refusal is not signifying your unwillingness to help in the future. In many instances, we say no to requests because we simply don’t want to do what’s being requested. In such cases, try to avoid the "let me get back to you after checking my calendar…" This avoidance technique keeps hope alive that you will accept the task, and can make for a bigger let down later when you say no.

The Life-Work Connections Employee Assistance Program is brought to you by Well-U, helping eligible individuals to assess issues, and provide short-term counseling and referrals.

Keith Stein | 7/4/2019

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