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Got Milk? What it Means for Bone Health

Got Milk? What it Means for Bone Health

Mom told you drinking milk would build strong bones. But a new study found that drinking more milk as a teenager does not lower your risk of hip fracture as an older adult. And it appears to increase that risk for men. Our expert sorts through the science and offers advice to jump-start kids' bone health early on.
To Grandmother’s House We Go: Keeping Holidays Safe for Kids

To Grandmother’s House We Go: Keeping Holidays Safe for Kids

Thanksgiving marks the beginning of gatherings highlighted by family, friends, and feasts. With so many loved ones milling about, it’s not uncommon for the littlest guests to sneak off and find their way into trouble. Pediatrician Dr. Anne Brayer offers steps for keeping kids safe in various settings.
Females Top Males in Number of Concussions, Length of Recovery

Females Top Males in Number of Concussions, Length of Recovery

If you're female, a knock to the head might be better or worse, depending on where you are in your menstrual cycle. URMC researchers recently found that women injured during the two weeks leading up to their period (the premenstrual phase) had a slower recovery and poorer health one month after injury compared to women injured during the two weeks directly after their period or women taking birth control pills.

To Go Organic, or Not to Go Organic: That Is the Question

To Go Organic, or Not to Go Organic: That Is the Question

Much like the octane rating of the fuel we fill up with affects our vehicle’s performance, we know that what we choose to put into our bodies matters. Here we try to nail down an answer to a question many of us wonder: Are organic foods superior to conventional versions?

Eating Disorders Often Missed in Overweight Teens

Eating Disorders Often Missed in Overweight Teens

About half of adolescents with eating disorders are or have been overweight. Because of that extra weight, it takes them longer to get diagnosed. As a result, they are often sicker when they finally get treatment. Parents are the frontline for recognizing signs of eating disorders in young people. Adolescent medicine specialist Dr. Shellie Yussman shares these tips to help parents recognize the difference between healthy weight loss and an eating disorder.