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Defining Heart Disease

People often equate heart disease with heart attacks, but they’re not one and the same. Heart disease is a broad term for many conditions that can raise your risk of stroke or heart failure. UR Medicine preventive cardiologist Dr. John Bisognano explains five common forms of heart disease and offers tips for managing or preventing them.

Flu Shot Facts: What, Why and When

Flu Shot Facts: What, Why and When

It’s flu season, and ads for flu shots are everywhere. You got one last year, but still got sick. So, why bother? UR Medicine vaccine expert Dr. John Treanor explains why it’s important to get a flu shot every year.

10/7/2015 | 0 comments
Heads Up: Take Care to Prevent Sports Injuries

Heads Up: Take Care to Prevent Sports Injuries

Fall sports are in full swing and for many young athletes that entails spending hours on the football field or soccer pitch. UR Medicine concussion expert says players and their families should weigh the risks versus benefits of contact sports carefully before making a commitment to a team.

9/29/2015 | 0 comments
To B12 or Not to B12—And Why?

To B12 or Not to B12—And Why?

The ABCs of vitamins can be mind-boggling, but a few key nutrients are at the forefront of good health. Vitamin B12 is among them, mainly for the role it plays in a healthy nervous system. UR Medicine registered dietitian Rachel Reeves explains B12’s function, sources, and who may be at risk for deficiency.

9/28/2015 | 0 comments
Tips for Tackling Tiredness

Tips for Tackling Tiredness

Fatigue is a common problem for many people and a common reason for seeing a doctor. UR Medicine Primary Care’s Dr. Laura Gift shares tactics for tackling five common energy-sapping culprits.

9/28/2015 | 0 comments
5 Food Factors for Lowering Prostate Cancer Risk

5 Food Factors for Lowering Prostate Cancer Risk

In the U.S., more than 220,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year. Some risk factors for prostate cancer—such as your family history or your race—can’t be controlled. Wilmot Cancer Institute nutrition specialist Joanna Lipp shares some things you can do that may reduce your risk of having prostate cancer.

9/25/2015 | 0 comments