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Skin Cancer Check: Know the ABCs

The bad news: there are more new cases of skin cancer than breast, prostate, lung, and colon cancers combined, according to the American Center Society. The good news: Skin cancer is almost always curable if caught early. Better yet: Take steps to protect your skin and avoid skin cancer entirely, says UR Medicine dermatologist Dr. Marc Brown
 

6 Steps to Lower Stroke Risk

Although a stroke can happen to anyone, there are certain factors that may increase your chances of having one. UR Medicine Neurologist Dr. Adam Kelly says you can improve your odds—and your overall health—by understanding and addressing your lifestyle and medical risk factors for stroke.

5/21/2015 | 0 comments

Bust Stress for a Better Ticker, Lower Stroke Risk

Stress, anyone? You know you need to tame it. But did you know that smart stress management can reap more than peace of mind? Recent research suggests that short-fused Type-As might face double the stroke risk of their more relaxed peers. UR Medicine stroke care specialists Dr. Curt Benesch and Dr. Amrendra Miranpuri offer stress-busting moves that may help lower your risk.
 
10/23/2014 | 0 comments

Daily Aspirin: Worth the Risks?

Taking a daily aspirin is touted as a simple way to stave off a heart attack or stroke. Yet, a recent study found that many doctors don’t recommend it to patients who might benefit. UR Medicine’s Dr. Michael Mendoza, one of the study’s authors, shares some facts about aspirin therapy.

8/18/2014 | 0 comments

High Blood Pressure? Shake the Salt Habit

 
Next time you reach for the salt shaker, stop and think: How much salt do you really need? Sure, it’s tasty and plays a part in your nutrition. But too much salt can not only ruin a dish, it may raise your blood pressure and harm your health. Cardiologist Dr. John Chad Teeters shares some tips for avoiding high blood pressure.
12/9/2013 | 0 comments

Do Your Numbers Count? New Guidelines for Cholesterol Meds

For years we’ve been told to watch our cholesterol levels. If your numbers were too high, your doctor likely prescribed medications, known as statins, to lower that cholesterol level and, along with it, reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Cardiologist Dr. John Bisognano explains new guidelines, recommending that doctors consider patients’ risk factors for cardiovascular disease, rather than focusing on the numbers.
 
12/2/2013 | 0 comments
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