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Men’s Health: Should You Be Screened for Prostate Cancer?

Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men. While it’s rarer in men under the age of 50, many men will have some form of the disease as they age. September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month and a good time to learn about early detection, according to UR Medicine urology expert Dr. Edward Messing.

Fitness Trackers: Trend or Tool?

Move over, wristwatch, there’s a new accessory in town and it’s sleek, functional and wildly popular. Wearable fitness devices are strapped around the wrists of people everywhere, tracking their every move. We asked UR Medicine family physician Dr. Michael Mendoza if they’re a trend, a status symbol, or a useful wellness tool.

7/28/2015 | 2 comments

Shoveling Snow? Be Heart Smart

Although beautiful to look at from the comfort of your living room, winter storms have a dark side that contrasts with the splendor of that frosty whiteness. If shoveling snow is on your to-do list, be sure to listen to your heart, says UR Medicine heart specialist Dr. John Bisognano.
1/20/2015 | 0 comments

Bust Stress for a Better Ticker, Lower Stroke Risk

Stress, anyone? You know you need to tame it. But did you know that smart stress management can reap more than peace of mind? Recent research suggests that short-fused Type-As might face double the stroke risk of their more relaxed peers. UR Medicine stroke care specialists Dr. Curt Benesch and Dr. Amrendra Miranpuri offer stress-busting moves that may help lower your risk.
10/23/2014 | 0 comments

Daily Aspirin: Worth the Risks?

Taking a daily aspirin is touted as a simple way to stave off a heart attack or stroke. Yet, a recent study found that many doctors don’t recommend it to patients who might benefit. UR Medicine’s Dr. Michael Mendoza, one of the study’s authors, shares some facts about aspirin therapy.

8/18/2014 | 0 comments

On The Rise: 5 Reasons Your Blood Pressure Medication Isn’t Working

Keeping your blood pressure in check is a good way to lower your risk of heart disease, stroke, and kidney disease. So, you follow orders, take your prescribed medication, and proudly accept your doctor’s praise when the blood pressure cuff demonstrates continued success. Until it doesn’t. UR Medicine hypertension expert Dr. John Bisognano explains why your blood pressure may rise, even after you thought you had it under control.
8/15/2014 | 0 comments