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Long-Acting Contraceptives Recommended for Teens

Long-Acting Contraceptives Recommended for Teens

Condoms and birth control pills may be the most recognizable methods of contraception. But recent studies show that long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) are the most effective method of preventing teen pregnancy. UR Medicine experts Drs. Andrew Aligne and Katherine Greenberg explain why LARCs are the best birth control option for teens.
Home Pregnancy Tests: What to Expect

Home Pregnancy Tests: What to Expect

Home pregnancy tests have pretty much revolutionized the way couples discover they’ve got a baby on the way. As technology has evolved, those over-the-counter kits have become increasingly sophisticated. UR Medicine fertility expert Dr. Wendy Vitek helps sort out the good ideas from the gimmicks.

Take Heart: Antidepressants in Pregnancy Not Likely to Cause Cardiac Defects

Take Heart: Antidepressants in Pregnancy Not Likely to Cause Cardiac Defects

Pregnancy is usually a time of excitement and anticipation, though joy may be overshadowed by worry for the 10 to 15 percent of pregnant women who struggle with depression. Moms-to-be can take heart—a new study shows that taking antidepressants during pregnancy does not raise the risk of cardiac defects in babies. UR Medicine high-risk pregnancy expert Dr. Eva K. Pressman says the study offers reassurance that antidepressants are safe to use in pregnancy, even in the first trimester. 
Morning Sickness: The Good News

Morning Sickness: The Good News

If morning sickness—and worry over treating it—overshadows the thrill of being pregnant, you may be happy to learn that a popular nausea medication appears to be safe for both mom and baby. A major study, published in this week’s Journal of the American Medical Association, reinforces the safety of metoclopramide (Reglan), which is often prescribed when other treatments don’t ease severe symptoms.
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