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Managing Migraines: Finding Your Headache Triggers

Managing Migraines: Finding Your Headache Triggers

Migraine headaches differ from person to person in terms of frequency, severity, cause and responsiveness to treatment. One key to controlling headaches is understanding what brings them on. UR Medicine headache specialist Dr. Catherine LaVigne sheds light on this debilitating condition and describes some common migraine triggers.
 
5 Simple Steps to a Healthier You

5 Simple Steps to a Healthier You

There’s nothing like a new year to get a fresh start. In this video, UR Medicine experts share a few small changes that can make a big difference in your health.

Breast Cancer: Simple Steps May Reduce Your Risk

Breast Cancer: Simple Steps May Reduce Your Risk

Breast cancer is the most common non-skin cancer among women. While treatments have improved significantly, prevention is always preferred. UR Medicine cancer specialist Dr. Alissa Huston shares some lifestyle changes that may help reduce your risk of developing breast cancer.
 
Breast Health Day: Dispelling Mammogram Myths

Breast Health Day: Dispelling Mammogram Myths

Mammograms are the gold standard for detecting breast cancer. But they can be uncomfortable, and women may avoid them out of fear of what they may reveal. Dr. Avice O’Connell, director of Women’s Imaging at UR Medicine, says discomfort and fear should not keep you from being screened.

Take Heart: Antidepressants in Pregnancy Not Likely to Cause Cardiac Defects

Take Heart: Antidepressants in Pregnancy Not Likely to Cause Cardiac Defects

Pregnancy is usually a time of excitement and anticipation, though joy may be overshadowed by worry for the 10 to 15 percent of pregnant women who struggle with depression. Moms-to-be can take heart—a new study shows that taking antidepressants during pregnancy does not raise the risk of cardiac defects in babies. UR Medicine high-risk pregnancy expert Dr. Eva K. Pressman says the study offers reassurance that antidepressants are safe to use in pregnancy, even in the first trimester. 
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