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Laticia A. Valle, M.D.

Endocrinology

Clinical Interests

Diabetes; General Endocrine, Metabolism

Contact Information

Phone Numbers

Appointment: (585) 276-3000

URMFGA member of the University of Rochester Medical Faculty Group

groupAn Accountable Health Partner

assignmentAccepting New Patients

Biography

Professional Background

Laticia Valle obtained her medical degree at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in 2002. She finished her Internal Medicine residency at the University of Rochester in 2005. After finishing residency she worked as a hospitalist at Highland Hospital in Rochester from 2005-2009. While working as a hospitalist she developed a special interest in endocrinology and diabetes and went on to complete a fellowship in Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism at The Ohio State University.
Dr. Valle is interested in the management and diagnosis of general endocrinology, including patients with diabetes, thyroid, adrenal, bone, and pituitary disorders.

Credentials

Faculty Appointments

Specialties

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism - American Board of Internal Medicine
  • Internal Medicine

Education

1998
BA | Washington University
Biology

2002
MD | Univ Rochester Sch Med/Dent
Medicine

Post-doctoral Training & Residency

07/01/2010 - 06/30/2012
Fellowship in Endocrinology at Ohio State University Medical Center

06/24/2003 - 06/30/2005
Residency in Internal Medicine at University of Rochester Medical Center

07/01/2010 - 06/30/2012
Fellowship in Endocrinology at Ohio State University Medical Center

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Publications

Journal Articles

1/2011
Valle LA, Kloos RT. "The prevalence of occult medullary thyroid carcinoma at autopsy." The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism.. 2011 Jan 0; 96(1):E109-13. Epub 2010 Oct 13.

0
Valle LA; Gorodeski-Baskin R; Porter K; Sipos J; Khawaja R; Ringel M; Kloos RT. "In Thyroidectomized Patients with Thyroid Cancer, a Serum TSH of 30 µU/ml after Thyroxine Withdrawal is not always Adequate for Detecting an Elevated Stimulated Serum Thyroglobulin". .

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