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Angela R. Girvin, M.D.

Contact Information

Phone Numbers

Appointment: (585) 276-3000

URMFGA member of the University of Rochester Medical Faculty Group

groupAn Accountable Health Partner

assignmentAccepting New Patients

Faculty Appointments

Patient Care Setting

Pediatrics

Biography

I am most interested in the treatment and care of children with leukemia/lymphoma and rare tumors as well as children with blood diseases.

Research

I am interested in improving the care provided to families with cancer and blood disorders through quality improvement research.

Credentials

Specialties

  • Pediatrics - American Board of Pediatrics
  • Pediatric Hematology-Oncology - American Board of Pediatrics

Education

2010
MD | School of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences - State University of New York at Buffalo

Post-doctoral Training & Residency

07/01/2013 - 06/30/2016
Fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh

07/01/2011 - 06/30/2013
Residency in Pediatrics at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh

07/01/2010 - 06/30/2011
Internship in Pediatrics at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh

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Awards

2019 - 2019
RISE to the Top Scholar
Location: University of Rochester

2015 - 2015
CureRock Trainee Research Award

2010 - 2010
Alpha Omega Alpha

2006 - 2006
Beta Beta Beta National Biological Honor Society

2003 - 2003
Delta Epsilon Sigma National Catholic University Honor Society

2003 - 2003
Sigma Alpha Sigma

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Clinical Trials

NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice)- Phase 2 Subprotocol of Ensartinib in Patients With Tumors Harboring ALK or ROS1 Genomic Alterations,NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice)- Phase 2 Subprotocol of Ensartinib in Patients With Tumors Harboring ALK or ROS1 Genomic Alterations

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well ensartinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with ALK or ROS1 genomic alterations that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory) and have spread to other places in the body (advanced). Ensartinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

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NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice)- Phase 2 Subprotocol of Tipifarnib in Patients With Tumors Harboring HRAS Genomic Alterations

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II pediatric MATCH trial studies how well tipifarnib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have recurred or spread to other places in the body (advanced), lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders, that have a genetic alteration in the gene HRAS. Tipifarnib may block the growth of cancer cells that have specific genetic changes in a gene called HRAS and may reduce tumor size.

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NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice) - Phase 2 Subprotocol of LOXO-101 (Larotrectinib) in Patients With Tumors Harboring Actionable NTRK Fusions

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well larotrectinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with NTRK fusions that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. Larotrectinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

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NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice)- A Phase 2 Subprotocol of Olaparib in Patients With Tumors Harboring Defects in DNA Damage Repair Genes

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well olaparib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with defects in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage repair genes that have spread to other places in the body (advanced) and have come back (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

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NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice) - Phase 2 Subprotocol of Palbociclib in Patients With Tumors Harboring Activating Alterations in Cell Cycle Genes,NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice) - Phase 2 Subprotocol of Palbociclib in Patients With Tumors Harboring Activating Alterations in Cell Cycle Genes,NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice) - Phase 2 Subprotocol of Palbociclib in Patients With Tumors Harboring Activating Alterations in Cell Cycle Genes

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well palbociclib works in treating patients with Rb positive solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with activating alterations (mutations) in cell cycle genes that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. Palbociclib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

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NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice) - Phase 2 Subprotocol of AG-120 (Ivosidenib) in Patients With Tumors Harboring IDH1 Mutations

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well ivosidenib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced), lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have IDH1 genetic alterations (mutations). Ivosidenib may block the growth of cancer cells that have specific genetic changes in an important signaling pathway called the IDH pathway.

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NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis For Therapy Choice)- Phase 2 Subprotocol of Ly3023414 in Patients With Solid Tumors

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well samotolisib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with TSC or PI3K/MTOR mutations that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Samotolisib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

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Renal Tumors Classification, Biology, and Banking Study

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This research trial studies kidney tumors in younger patients. Collecting and storing samples of tumor tissue, blood, and urine from patients with cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that occur in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

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A Phase 3 Randomized Trial for Patients With De Novo AML Comparing Standard Therapy Including Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin (GO) to CPX-351 With GO, and the Addition of the FLT3 Inhibitor Gilteritinib for Patients With FLT3 Mutations

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase III trial compares standard chemotherapy to therapy with CPX-351 and/or gilteritinib for patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia with or without FLT3 mutations. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin, cytarabine, and gemtuzumab ozogamicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. CPX-351 is made up of daunorubicin and cytarabine and is made in a way that makes the drugs stay in the bone marrow longer and could be less likely to cause heart problems than traditional anthracycline drugs, a common class of chemotherapy drug. Some acute myeloid leukemia patients have an abnormality in the structure of a gene called FLT3. Genes are pieces of DNA (molecules that carry instructions for development, functioning, growth and reproduction) inside each cell that tell the cell what to do and when to grow and divide. FLT3 plays an important role in the normal making of blood cells. This gene can have permanent changes that cause it to function abnormally by making cancer cells grow. Gilteritinib may block the abnormal function of the FLT3 gene that makes cancer cells grow. The overall goals of this study are, 1) to compare the effects, good and/or bad, of CPX-351 with daunorubicin and cytarabine on people with newly diagnosed AML to find out which is better, 2) to study the effects, good and/or bad, of adding gilteritinib to AML therapy for patients with high amounts of FLT3/ITD or other FLT3 mutations and 3) to study changes in heart function during and after treatment for AML. Giving CPX-351 and/or gilteritinib with standard chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia compared to standard chemotherapy alone.

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A Phase 3 Randomized Trial of Inotuzumab Ozogamicin (IND#:133494, NSC#: 772518) for Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B-ALL; Risk-Adapted Post-Induction Therapy for High-Risk B-ALL, Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia, and Disseminated B-Lly

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase III trial studies whether inotuzumab ozogamicin added to post-induction chemotherapy for patients with High-Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) improves outcomes. This trial also studies the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with ALL therapy without inotuzumab ozogamicin. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a type of chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Other drugs used in the chemotherapy regimen, such as cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, methotrexate, leucovorin, mercaptopurine, prednisone, thioguanine, vincristine, and pegaspargase work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial will also study the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) and disseminated B lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with high-risk ALL chemotherapy. The overall goal of this study is to understand if adding inotuzumab ozogamicin to standard of care chemotherapy maintains or improves outcomes in High Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (HR B-ALL). The first part of the study includes the first two phases of therapy: Induction and Consolidation. This part will collect information on the leukemia, as well as the effects of the initial treatment, in order to classify patients into post-consolidation treatment groups. On the second part of this study, patients will receive the remainder of the chemotherapy cycles (interim maintenance I, delayed intensification, interim maintenance II, maintenance), with some patients randomized to receive inotuzumab. Other aims of this study include investigating whether treating both males and females with the same duration of chemotherapy maintains outcomes for males who have previously been treated for an additional year compared to girls, as well as to evaluate the best ways to help patients adhere to oral chemotherapy regimens. Finally, this study will be the first to track the outcomes of subjects with disseminated B-cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B LLy) or Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia (MPAL) when treated with B-ALL chemotherapy.

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A Phase 3 Trial Investigating Blinatumomab ( NSC# 765986) in Combination With Chemotherapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard Risk or Down Syndrome B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) and the Treatment of Patients With Localized B-Lymphoblastic Lymphoma (B-LLy)

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed, standard risk B-lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lymphoblastic lymphoma with or without Down syndrome. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine, dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, pegaspargase, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and thioguanine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Leucovorin decreases the toxic effects of methotrexate. Giving monoclonal antibody therapy with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells. Giving blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with B-ALL. This trial also assigns patients into different chemotherapy treatment regimens based on risk (the chance of cancer returning after treatment). Treating patients with chemotherapy based on risk may help doctors decide which patients can best benefit from which chemotherapy treatment regimens.

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Stopping Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKI) to Assess Treatment-Free Remission (TFR) in Pediatric Chronic Myeloid Leukemia - Chronic Phase (CML-CP)

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II trial studies how stopping tyrosine kinase inhibitors will affect treatment-free remission in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. When the level of disease is very low, it's called molecular remission. TKIs are a type of medication that help keep this level low. However, after being in molecular remission for a specific amount of time, it may not be necessary to take tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It is not yet known whether stopping tyrosine kinase inhibitors will help patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase continue or re-achieve molecular remission.

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A Phase 3 Study of 131I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (131I-MIBG) or Crizotinib Added to Intensive Therapy for Children With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma (NBL)

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy may work better compared to crizotinib and standard therapy alone in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.

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A Phase 2 Study of Veliparib (ABT-888) and Local Irradiation, Followed by Maintenance Veliparib and Temozolomide, in Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Grade Glioma (HGG) Without H3 K27M or BRAFV600E Mutations

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II trial studies how well veliparib, radiation therapy, and temozolomide work in treating patients with newly diagnosed malignant glioma without H3 K27M or BRAFV600 mutations. Poly adenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribose polymerases (PARPs) are proteins that help repair DNA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as veliparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving veliparib, radiation therapy, and temozolomide may work better in treating patients with newly diagnosed malignant glioma without H3 K27M or BRAFV600 mutations compared to radiation therapy and temozolomide alone.

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A Randomized Phase 3 Study of Vincristine, Dactinomycin, Cyclophosphamide (VAC) Alternating With Vincristine and Irinotecan (VI) Versus VAC/VI Plus Temsirolimus (TORI, Torisel, NSC# 683864) in Patients With Intermediate Risk (IR) Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS)

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy (vincristine sulfate, dactinomycin, cyclophosphamide alternated with vincristine sulfate and irinotecan hydrochloride or vinorelbine) works compared to combination chemotherapy plus temsirolimus in treating patients with rhabdomyosarcoma (cancer that forms in the soft tissues, such as muscle), and has an intermediate chance of coming back after treatment (intermediate risk). Drugs used work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Combination chemotherapy and temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether chemotherapy plus temsirolimus is more effective than chemotherapy alone in treating patients with intermediate-risk rhabdomyosarcoma.

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A Phase 3 Study of Active Surveillance for Low Risk and a Randomized Trial of Carboplatin vs. Cisplatin for Standard Risk Pediatric and Adult Patients With Germ Cell Tumors

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase III trial studies how well active surveillance, bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, or cisplatin work in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors. Active surveillance may help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors after their tumor is removed. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

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International Phase 3 Trial in Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (Ph+ALL) Testing Imatinib in Combination With Two Different Cytotoxic Chemotherapy Backbones

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

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Risk-Stratified Therapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Down Syndrome

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.

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NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice) Screening Protocol

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This Pediatric MATCH screening and multi-sub-study phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in pediatric patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, or histiocytic disorders that have progressed following at least one line of standard systemic therapy and/or for which no standard treatment exists that has been shown to prolong survival. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic changes or abnormalities (mutations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic mutation, and may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors or non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

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A Phase 2 Study of Inotuzumab Ozogamicin (NSC# 772518) in Children and Young Adults With Relapsed or Refractory CD22+ B-Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL)

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin works in treating younger patients with B-lymphoblastic lymphoma or CD22 positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them.

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A Phase 2 Study of Reduced Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Average-Risk WNT-Driven Medulloblastoma Patients

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II trial studies how well reduced doses of radiation therapy to the brain and spine (craniospinal) and chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed type of brain tumor called WNT)/Wingless (WNT)-driven medulloblastoma. Recent studies using chemotherapy and radiation therapy have been shown to be effective in treating patients with WNT-driven medulloblastoma. However, there is a concern about the late side effects of treatment, such as learning difficulties, lower amounts of hormones, or other problems in performing daily activities. Radiotherapy uses high-energy radiation from x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide and lomustine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving reduced craniospinal radiation therapy and chemotherapy may kill tumor cells and may also reduce the late side effects of treatment.

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NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice) - Phase 2 Subprotocol of Selumetinib (AZD6244 Hydrogen Sulfate) in Patients With Tumors Harboring Activating MAPK Pathway Mutations,NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice) - Phase 2 Subprotocol of Selumetinib (AZD6244 Hydrogen Sulfate) in Patients With Tumors Harboring Activating MAPK Pathway Mutations

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well selumetinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with MAPK pathway activation mutations that have spread to other places in the body and have come back or do not respond to treatment. Selumetinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

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The Project: EveryChild Protocol: A Registry, Eligibility Screening, Biology and Outcome Study

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This study gathers health information for the Project: Every Child for younger patients with cancer. Gathering health information over time from younger patients with cancer may help doctors find better methods of treatment and on-going care.

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Utilizing Response- and Biology-Based Risk Factors to Guide Therapy in Patients With Non-High-Risk Neuroblastoma,Utilizing Response- and Biology-Based Risk Factors to Guide Therapy in Patients With Non-High-Risk Neuroblastoma

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This phase III trial studies how well response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy works in treating younger patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma. Sometimes a tumor may not need treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Measuring biomarkers in tumor cells may help plan when effective treatment is necessary and what the best treatment is. Response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy may be effective in treating patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma and may help to avoid some of the risks and side effects related to standard treatment.

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Umbrella Long-Term Follow-Up Protocol

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This clinical trial keeps track of and collects follow-up information from patients who are currently enrolled on or have participated in a Children's Oncology Group study. Developing a way to keep track of patients who have participated in Children's Oncology Group studies may allow doctors learn more about the long-term effects of cancer treatment and help them reduce problems related to treatment and improve patient quality of life.

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Phase III Randomized Trial of Post-Radiation Chemotherapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Ependymoma Ages 1 to 21 Years

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This partially randomized phase III trial is studying maintenance chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to observation following induction chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating young patients with newly diagnosed ependymoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.

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Neuroblastoma Biology Studies,Neuroblastoma Biology Studies,Neuroblastoma Biology Studies

Lead Researcher: Angela R Girvin

This research trial studies biomarkers in tumor tissue samples from patients with newly diagnosed neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Studying samples of tumor tissue from patients with cancer in the laboratory may help doctors identify and learn more about biomarkers related to cancer.

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Publications

Journal Articles

5/18/2021
Fries C, Girvin AR, Korones DN, Weintraub L, Fitzpatrick L, Andolina JR. "Myeloablative Carboplatin and Thiotepa With Autologous Stem Cell Rescue for Nonmedulloblastoma High-risk CNS Tumors in Young Children." Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology.. 2021 May 18; Epub 2021 May 18.

8/2018
Andolina JR, Reinish AL, Akhtar R, Noronha S, Shand JC, Girvin A, Korones DN, Bruckner LB, Mullen CA, Curran KJ, Boulad F. "Successful reduced-intensity conditioning hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria with aplastic anemia in two children." Pediatric blood & cancer.. 2018 Aug 0; 65(8):e27218. Epub 2018 May 03.

6/2009
Steiner WW, Steiner EM, Girvin AR, Plewik LE. "Novel nucleotide sequence motifs that produce hotspots of meiotic recombination in Schizosaccharomyces pombe." Genetics.. 2009 Jun 0; 182(2):459-69. Epub 2009 Apr 10.

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