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Bacteria Responsible for Incurable Bone Infection Hide in Bone Micro-Channels

Bacteria Responsible for Incurable Bone Infection Hide in Bone Micro-Channels

Researchers in the Center for Musculoskeletal Research believe they have found that Staphylococcus aureus can hide in tiny channels within bone, defying several long-held beliefs about the bacteria. The team believes this may contribute to the high reinfection rate in S. aureus bone infections. 

12/19/2016
Center for AIDS Research Celebrates Scientific Progress and Community Outreach on World AIDS Day

Center for AIDS Research Celebrates Scientific Progress and Community Outreach on World AIDS Day

The University of Rochester Center for AIDS Research recognized outstanding research conducted by students and post-doctoral fellows and honored a local advocate for fostering community collaboration and participation in HIV/AIDS research.  

12/7/2016
 Birbeck Appointed to NIH Post on Global Health

Birbeck Appointed to NIH Post on Global Health

University of Rochester Medical Center neurologist Gretchen Birbeck, M.D., M.P.H., has been chosen to serve on the Advisory Board of the National Institutes of Health’s Fogarty International Center, which supports basic, clinical, and applied medical research and training for U.S. and foreign investigators working in the developing world.

12/5/2016
FDA Funds Study of Therapies for Pain, Addiction, Sedation

FDA Funds Study of Therapies for Pain, Addiction, Sedation

A team led by Rochester researchers will use up to $4 million from the FDA to speed the development of new treatments for acute and chronic pain, addiction and sedation. Currently, patients have few safe and effective treatment options. 

10/20/2016
New Technologies May Speed Flu Vaccine Testing

New Technologies May Speed Flu Vaccine Testing

The AIR™ Platform, a silicon chip and imaging system marketed by Adarza Biosystems, can detect immune responses to flu virus and vaccines alike.  With a small blood sample, doctors can confirm a suspected flu infection, see if a vaccine induces a desired immune response, or predict which strains of flu will affect people in the coming flu season.

9/12/2016