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“Virtual” House Calls Provide Effective Parkinson’s Care

“Virtual” House Calls Provide Effective Parkinson’s Care

When James Parkinson published an essay in 1817 describing the condition that would eventually bear his name, his findings were formulated – in great part – by watching people walk the streets and parks near his home in London.  Flash forward some 200 years and this basic principal of observation could enable neurologists to provide care directly to Parkinson’s patients who are sitting in their own living rooms thousands of miles away.

Preparing for “Silver Tsunami” in ERs

Preparing for “Silver Tsunami” in ERs

Already strained and overcrowded, emergency departments are gearing up for a dramatic rise in the older-adult population. A makeover is needed, positioning emergency units as the “front porch” of the hospital instead of the “front door,” writes Manish Shah, M.D., M.P.H., co-author of a paper in Health Affairs.

URMC Joins Infertility Research Network

URMC Joins Infertility Research Network

The University of Rochester Medical Center is a new member of the Reproductive Medicine Network, a nationwide network of centers conducting research to improve the care of women and men with infertility and other reproductive disorders. 

Meds for ADHD, Depression Dangerous in Patients with Heart Rhythm Disorder

Meds for ADHD, Depression Dangerous in Patients with Heart Rhythm Disorder

Last week, several members of URMC’s Heart Research Follow-up team presented new research at the American Heart Association’s Annual Scientific Sessions in Dallas. Among the findings – medications for ADHD and depression are dangerous in patients with Long QT syndrome, a disorder that makes the heart particularly susceptible to arrhythmias.  

Drug May Blunt Neurological Damage Caused by Liver Failure

Drug May Blunt Neurological Damage Caused by Liver Failure

Individuals with impaired liver function are unable to remove ammonia – a by-product of normal cellular activity – from their bodies fast enough.  This result is a host of neurological problems, including seizures, for which doctors have no effective treatment.  A new study shows that an existing blood pressure drug may be able to prevent the molecular chain reaction in the brain triggered by ammonia.