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Birbeck Honored for Work Combating Malaria in Africa

Birbeck Honored for Work Combating Malaria in Africa

University of Rochester Medical Center neurologist Gretchen L. Birbeck, M.D., M.P.H., has been recognized by the American Neurological Association (ANA) with one of its 2017 scientific awards for her research on the neurological damage associated with malaria in sub-Saharan Africa.   Birbeck divides her time between Rochester and health projects in Africa. 

Study Shed New Light on Brain’s Decision-making Process

Study Shed New Light on Brain’s Decision-making Process

New research reveals the complex circuits involved in regulating the neurotransmitter dopamine in our brains.  Traditionally thought to be limited to reward seeking, the new study shows that parts of the ‘emotional’ brain may also manipulate dopamine to help us pay attention and react to new information in the environment.

Protein Key to Nerve Health Hitches a Ride on Brain’s Garbage Truck

Protein Key to Nerve Health Hitches a Ride on Brain’s Garbage Truck

A new study shows that the brain’s waste removal system serves as both trash collector and delivery service, providing neurons with a protein important to maintaining cognitive function while simultaneously cleaning brain tissue.  The research may help explain why different genetic varieties of the protein, called apolipoprotein E (apoE), can indicate risk for Alzheimer’s disease or promote longevity.

Study: Home Care Improves Stroke Outcomes

Study: Home Care Improves Stroke Outcomes

Stroke patients who are paired with caregivers that help them transition back to their homes are significantly less likely to be readmitted to the hospital.  The results of the pilot study, which showed a 39 percent reduction in the readmission rates of stroke patients at Strong Memorial Hospital, were presented last week at the International Stroke Conference in Texas.

Mother’s Touch May Extend to Brain Development

Mother’s Touch May Extend to Brain Development

A new study sheds light on changes in the brain that may explain why young infants who are placed in an orphanage or foster care often struggle with social relationships later in life.