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ADNI3

Research Question:
What is the relationship between memory and thinking ability, brain scans (pictures of the brain), genetics, blood and brain-spinal fluid features and the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD)?

Basic Study Information

Purpose:
ADNI3 is not a treatment study. It continues research that began in 2004 (ADNI1) and will follow people over a five year period using the information collected from thinking and memory testing, brain imaging, genetics testing, and blood and brain-spinal fluid testing to help improve the way AD research is conducted. Approximately 1070 - 2000 participants will be enrolled at 59 sites in the US and Canada. Three groups will be enrolled and evaluated: those with normal thinking and memory, those with mild cognition problems, and those with mild Alzheimer's disease. The normal thinking cohort is filled; the study is now only recruiting people with mild cognition problems (MCI) or mild Alzheimer's disease.

Location: AD-CARE at Monroe Community Hospital; 435 East Henrietta Rd., Rochester, NY 14620
Study Web URL:  http://ADNI3.org
Study Reference #: 64311

Lead Researcher (Principal Investigator)

Lead Researcher: Anton Porsteinsson

Study Contact Information

Study Coordinator: Nancy Kowalski, MS, RN
Phone: (585) 760-6569
Email: nancy_kowalski@urmc.rochester.edu

Additional Study Details

Study Details:
If you are eligible to participate, your participation in this study will last 3 to 5 years, depending on which group you fit in. MCI participants will come to the clinic every year for up to 5 years. Mild AD participants will come to the clinic every year for 3 years and then will participate in annual phone checks. Visits will include thinking and memory tests, collecting blood samples and brain imaging (MRI & PET scans). Some visits will include collecting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by lumbar puncture.

Number of Visits:  6 to 10
Parking:  Free
Transportation Coverage: 
Reimbursement:  No

Learn More About These Conditions

More information about Alzheimer's disease

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