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Leukemia Treatment: Adding an Antibody to Front-Line Chemotherapy

Research Question:
What are the side effects of a monoclonal antibody, inotuzumab ozogamicin, and how well does it work when given with front-line chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Basic Study Information

Purpose:
Monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating young adults with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This trial studies the side effects of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works when given with front-line chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Location: University of Rochester Medical Center
Study Reference #: CLEU18093

Lead Researcher (Principal Investigator)

Lead Researcher: Kristen O'Dwyer

Study Contact Information

Study Coordinator: Haley Misch
Phone: (585) 275-9485
Email: Haley_Misch@URMC.Rochester.edu

Additional Study Details

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