The Brain in Health and Disease

The human brain, with its 100 billion neurons and 100 trillion synapses, can be considered evolution's greatest achievement. Understanding how genes and environment build this extraordinarily complex structure and modulate its function in health and disease is a major focus of modern neuroscience. Approaching this challenge from a variety of directions, the Center for Neural Development and Disease (CNDD) at the University of Rochester Medical Center brings together faculty from diverse departments, including Neurology, Pediatrics, Biomedical Genetics, Emergency Medicine, and Neurobiology and Anatomy, to carry out research directed toward this common goal.

The Center for Neural Development and Disease is home to seven Principal Investigators (PIs), all of whom serve as mentors to graduate students in the Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Neuroscience. Working in collaboration with research faculty, post-doctoral fellows, graduate students and lab technicians, Center PIs are carrying out research programs that explore a variety of issues relevant to neural development and disease. Active research in the Center includes the study of fundamental neural mechanisms in simple model organisms, research on protection against of neural insults (including HIV infection, stroke and neurodegeneration), studies on the mechanisms and treatment of neuromuscular and neoplastic disorders, and work on promoting recovery after traumatic brain injury.

The Center for Neural Development and Disease is located in the Kornberg Medical Research Building on the campus of the University of Rochester School of Medicine. An open lab environment, as well as regular seminars, fosters collaboration and interaction between Center faculty, staff and students.