Golisano Children's Hospital Pediatric Practice

Cholesterol Screening

A cholesterol test measures the amount of cholesterol and triglycerides in serum (part of the blood).

Blood is drawn from a vein, usually from the inside of the elbow or the back of the hand. The puncture site is cleaned with antiseptic, and an elastic band or blood pressure cuff is placed around the upper arm to apply pressure and restrict blood flow through the vein. This causes veins to fill with blood.

A needle is inserted into the vein, and the blood is collected in an air-tight vial or a syringe. During the procedure, the band is removed to restore circulation and prevent bruising. Once the blood has been collected, the needle is removed, and the puncture site is covered to stop any bleeding.

Note that veins and arteries vary in size from one patient to another and from one side of the body to the other. Obtaining a blood sample from some people may be more difficult than from others.

In infants or young children, the area is cleansed with antiseptic and punctured with a sharp needle or a lancet. The blood may be collected in a pipette (small glass tube), on a slide, onto a test strip, or into a small container. Cotton or a bandage may be applied to the puncture site if there is any continued bleeding.

When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain, while others feel only a prick or stinging sensation. Afterward, there may be some throbbing.

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Golisano Children's Hospital Development

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Call (585) 275-2821
Monday through Friday,
8 a.m.– 4:30 p.m.

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