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URMC / Wilmot Cancer Institute / News & Events / Dialogue Blog / March 2020 / Coping During COVID-19: Ideas to Help with Quarantine

Coping During COVID-19: Ideas to Help with Quarantine

Programs and events at Wilmot Cancer Institute’s Pluta Integrative Oncology and Wellness Center have been cancelled in an effort to stop the coronavirus.

What can you do to stay calm and healthy at home?A woman practices yoga in her home.

Judy Zeeman-Golden, LMSW, manager of the Center, offers the following ideas:

Communicate: While staying at home is challenging emotionally, mentally, and socially, technology makes it easier than ever to stay connected. Phone calls and text messages may be second nature by now, but you could also consider video chat programs like FaceTime on the iPhone or Google Hangouts on any device. It can be a good compromise when being together in person is not possible.  You can even arrange a time to get together virtually with friends and family for coffee, dinner or drinks.  Create a time and then all log in to a chat program together!

Exercise: Get out your resistance bands, yoga mat or walking shoes! There is nothing like exercise to make you feel whole again. Just make sure to avoid larger groups and practice social distancing. If you wanted to stay indoors, YouTube has exercise videos that could help you get started.  Also, the Nike Training Club app has great exercise videos, as does Amazon Prime.

Meditate: It’s a good practice during this challenging time. Consider downloading a meditation app on your phone or computer, such as Headspace, Ten Percent Happier (which offers a free “Coronavirus Sanity Guide” with meditations and other resources) and Calm.  Please note, these apps require a paid subscription to access the full app, but they usually have free trial periods or limited free sessions.

Try a new hobby: Did you love to write poems as a child, or perhaps you loved drawing, coloring or painting? Were puzzles your thing, or sitting down with a great book? Some hobbies may require supplies that you don’t have at home, but you might be able to order them online. Other ideas include: Knitting, calligraphy, writing, baking, taking an online class, watching movies, learning a new language or fixing or tinkering with something around the house.

Cook: Prepare a meal with all the foods in your refrigerator that you have been stockpiling. If you live near an older adult in your neighborhood, consider dropping off a portion of your cooked bounty to them. (Just be sure to practice good hygiene habits like frequent handwashing while cooking.) If you need meal ideas, check out our Cooking for Wellness blog, which features recipes our registered dietitians have taught in our cooking classes or chef demos.

Listen: Music is a balm for stressed nerves. If you’d prefer stories or news, there are millions of podcasts available on thousands of topics. Find music online, through an app like Spotify or Pandora, or pull out the CD player or boom box. If you’re looking for Playlist recommendations, we heard that University of Rochester President Sarah Mangelsdorf has enjoyed a Spotify playlist called “Quarantunes” curated by Rita Wilson while quarantined with her husband Tom Hanks in Australia.

Seek support: While all in-person support groups and events have been temporarily suspended at Wilmot, our social workers can recommend online resources for cancer. If you would like to learn more about these options or have other questions about support resources, contact Wilmot’s Community Resource Line at (585) 276-4708 or by email at WilmotCommunityResHelp@urmc.rochester.edu.

Global Administrator | 3/20/2020

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