Neurology

Conditions We Treat

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a painful progressive condition caused by compression of a key nerve in the wrist. It occurs when the median nerve, which runs from the forearm into the hand, becomes pressed or squeezed at the wrist. Symptoms usually start gradually, with pain, weakness, or numbness in the hand and wrist, radiating up the arm. As symptoms worsen, people might feel tingling during the day, and decreased grip strength may make it difficult to form a fist, grasp small objects, or perform other manual tasks. 

In some cases no direct cause of the syndrome can be identified. Most likely the disorder is due to a congenital predisposition; the carpal tunnel is simply smaller in some people than in others. However, the risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome is especially common in those performing assembly line work.

Treatment

Initial treatment generally involves resting the affected hand and wrist for at least two weeks, avoiding activities that may worsen symptoms, and immobilizing the wrist in a splint to avoid further damage from twisting or bending. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and other nonprescription pain relievers, may ease pain. Cool (ice) packs and prednisone (taken by mouth) or lidocaine (injected directly into the wrist) can relieve swelling and pressure on the median nerve and provide immediate, temporary relief.  

Prognosis

Recurrence of carpal tunnel syndrome following treatment is rare. The majority of patients recover completely. To prevent workplace-related carpal tunnel syndrome, workers can do on-the-job conditioning, perform stretching exercises, take frequent rest breaks, wear splints to keep wrists straight, and use correct posture and wrist position. Wearing fingerless gloves can help keep hands warm and flexible.

Helpful Resources

Highland Neurology

NYS Designated Stroke Center

NYS Dept of Health

Use the F.A.S.T. Test

If you think you or someone you know is having a stroke.

Face

Ask the person to smile. Is the face lopsided?

Arm

Ask the person to raise arms. Does one arm drift down?

Speech

Ask the person to repeat a phrase. Does their speech sound strange? Can they do it without slurring words?

Time

Don't waste it. Call 911 now.