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URMC / News / UR Medicine Experts Host Lupus Education Program Oct. 28

UR Medicine Experts Host Lupus Education Program Oct. 28

Thursday, October 12, 2017

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People living with lupus and their caregivers can learn more about challenges of managing the disease, latest therapies and research advances during UR Medicine’s Lupus Education Day from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 28, at the University of Rochester School of Nursing.

“This is a great opportunity for people with lupus to expand their knowledge and understanding of the disease, consider participating in research programs and network with others,” said Jennifer Anolik, M.D., Ph.D., director of UR Medicine’s lupus clinic, which is nationally recognized for clinical expertise and research.

The 11th annual symposium includes the nuts and bolts of lupus, led by Ummara Shah, M.D., and Allen Anandarajah, M.D., will discuss the patient-centered care model. Other sessions focus  on research and clinical trial updates, ways to be an active participant in care and the popular patient panel. To register for the free event, call (585) 275-2891.

The lupus team also includes R. John Looney, M.D., Christopher Palma, M.D., and Mita Moorthi, F.N.P. The team recently received a Greater Rochester Health Foundation grant to establish a lupus clinic at the Anthony Jordan Health Center to increase access to care and improve outcomes for Rochester residents living with lupus.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder that can vary from a mild condition to a life-threatening illness. It can cause joints to swell and attack the kidneys, heart, lungs and liver, leading to pain, dysfunction, and sometimes permanent damage to healthy tissues.

More than 1.5 million Americans suffer with the potentially fatal disease. About 90 percent of patients are women who were diagnosed during their childbearing years. The disease can be a challenge to diagnose, but detecting it early is essential to minimize damage to the organs and improve quality of life.

Most people with lupus can control the disease with medication and consistent monitoring by physicians. A smaller set of patients, however, suffer a more extreme disease course, sometimes facing life-threatening problems.

University of Rochester Medical Centerlupus researchers lead laboratory and translational research programs to advance patient care. URMC is a main site for the National Institutes of Health Accelerating Medicines Partnership in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus Network. The program brings together the NIH, biopharmaceutical companies, advocacy organizations and academic scientists designed to rapidly identify promising drug targets and develop much-needed new treatments for patients with these conditions. 

Media Contact

Leslie White

(585) 273-1119

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