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Former KL2 Scholar Honored as Brilliant New Investigator

Former KL2 Scholar Honored as Brilliant New Investigator

Past KL2 scholar, Feng (Vankee) Lin, PhD, RN, is set to receive the Brilliant New Investigator Award from the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science (CANS) this fall. Lin is an early stage investigator in the UR School of Nursing who has demonstrated extraordinary potential to have a significant impact on the science and practice of nursing and health care.

Find Research Participants Using Tools on the New Health Research Website

Find Research Participants Using Tools on the New Health Research Website

The UR CTSI offers many resources for investigators who conduct research involving human subjects, including access to local and national research participant registries. These online databases help match investigators with healthy volunteers and patients with specific illnesses who are interested in participating in clinical trials.  

The Heart-Brain Connection: The Link between LQTS and Seizures

The Heart-Brain Connection: The Link between LQTS and Seizures

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center recently discovered a genetic link between Long QT Syndrome, a rare cardiac rhythm disease, and an increased risk for seizures. The study, which was partially funded by the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, also found that people with LQTS who experience seizures are at greater risk of sudden cardiac death. 

CTSI Faculty Pilot Project Identifies New Hearing Test for Autism Risk

CTSI Faculty Pilot Project Identifies New Hearing Test for Autism Risk

Research partially supported by a CTSI Faculty Pilot award may offer a new way to screen very young children for Autism. The study shows that children with Autism may have inner ear deficiencies that impact their ability to recognize speech.

New Study: Race, Not Gender, is Key Factor in NIH Funding

New Study: Race, Not Gender, is Key Factor in NIH Funding

A new study in Academic Medicine has found that women of color were less likely to receive NIH funding compared with Caucasian women. The study concluded that race, not gender, is the most significant factor influencing funding from the NIH.