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Course Descriptions

CMT 401: Essentials of Clinical Laboratory Science (3 cr.) Fall Semester

This course is offered in the first 5 weeks of the program beginning in the Fall semester and the schedule is Monday through Friday; 8:30am-4pm. The learning model is wrap around lecture followed by hands on laboratory experiences. The total number of hours including lecture and lab experiences is 150. In class didactic contact time is 37.5 hours. The methods used are largely student centered laboratory exercises designed to prepare students for the clinical practicum. Didactic time is limited to the practical knowledge required for students to competently engage in laboratory activities.

  1. Overview:
    • Orientation-Program Overview; Review of Student Handbook and Policies: ½ day
    • Clinical Laboratory Safety; Infection Control; Universal Precautions; Ethics and Data Integrity: ½ day
    • Pre-analytic Techniques and Patient Safety Goals: ½ day
    • Phlebotomy Training: ½ day
  2. Basic Laboratory Techniques in the content areas listed below (with approximate number of days spent on each subject indicated).
    • Clinical Chemistry: 5 days
    • Clinical Hematology: 5 days​
    • Immunohematology and Transfusion Medicine: 5 days
    • Clinical Microbiology & Serologic Techniques: 6 days
    • Renal Physiology and Urinalysis: 2 days

CMT 402: Clinical Practicum I (7 cr.) Fall Semester

This clinical practicum is 325 hours in the fall semester beginning immediately after the 4 weeks of CMT 401 are completed. (The lectures for the non-clinical courses are offered 8-10 hours per week outside of this course.) The schedule will be available before course registration begins.

This course is entirely composed of supervised clinical experiences scheduled in the following disciplines: Blood Bank and Transfusion Medicine, Clinical Chemistry, Clinical Hematology & Hemostasis, Clinical Microbiology, Urinalysis, Immunology/Serology, Histopathology, Phlebotomy, and Laboratory Management and Operations. Didactic time is limited to the practical knowledge required for students to meet targeted learning outcomes and to achieve competency in the clinical laboratory procedures and protocols as assigned. Students are supervised throughout these experiences by a NYS Licensed Clinical Laboratory Technologist.

CMT 403: Clinical Practicum II (8.5 cr.) Spring Semester

This clinical practicum is 425 hours in the spring semester. (The lectures for the non-clinical courses are offered 8-10 hours per week outside of this course.) The schedule will be available before course registration begins.

This course is entirely composed of supervised clinical experiences scheduled in the following disciplines: Blood Bank and Transfusion Medicine, Clinical Chemistry, Clinical Hematology & Hemostasis, Clinical Microbiology, Urinalysis, Immunology/Serology, Histopathology, Phlebotomy, and Laboratory Management and Operations. Didactic time is limited to the practical knowledge required for students to meet targeted learning outcomes and to achieve competency in the clinical laboratory procedures and protocols as assigned. Students are supervised throughout these experiences by a NYS Licensed Clinical Laboratory Technologist.

CMT 404: Special Topics in Clinical Laboratory Science (0.5 cr.) Spring Semester

This course offers 7.5 hours of traditional didactic material. The format used for this course is seminar style whereby faculty experts are invited to lecture on specialty topics of Laboratory Sciences, including: Tissue Typing-HLA, Advanced Molecular Diagnostic Studies, Cytogenetics and Micro-Array.

Readings and lectures are designed to provide students with basic understandings of the diagnostic tests provided by these departments and the scientific principles of the methodologies. Students will also make correlations between test results and diagnosis, prognosis and disease management.

CMT 405: Laboratory Management and Operations (0.5 cr.) Spring Semester

This course offers 7.5 hours of traditional didactic material and 25 hours observing real world operational and management initiatives in the department of pathology. Learning outcomes are evaluated by assessing project work either in groups or independently.

This course provides learning experiences in the following topics: operations, laboratory informatics, finance, education, licensure, leadership and professional development, quality systems management including inspection readiness and laboratory compliance. The following principles are also included: LEAN in the clinical pathology practice, instrument/assay validation, staff competencies and preparedness, patient safety, and compliance. Topics are presented in lecture format. Students are provided with a list of required out of class assignments and the opportunity to choose a group project from a list of management topics.

CMT 411: Clinical Chemistry I (2 cr.) Fall Semester

This is a 30 hour didactic course that provides the cognitive foundation required for students to competently apply clinical chemistry principles to the practice of clinical laboratory science. This is the first course in a series of two clinical chemistry courses in the program.

Clinical and analytical correlations are organized by analyte, including: amino acids and proteins; non- protein nitrogen compounds; enzymes; carbohydrates; lipids and lipoproteins; electrolytes; blood gases, pH, and buffer systems; and trace and toxic elements (including the spectrometry, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and alternative analytical techniques). The chemical principles of each analyte are presented in a situational learning model that makes correlations: to disease states, interpretations of data, problem solving, and quality assurance in addition to other real world aspects of the clinical chemistry laboratory.

CMT 412: Clinical Hematology I (1.5 cr.) Fall Semester

This is a 22.5 hour didactic course that provides the cognitive foundation required for students to competently apply clinical hematology principles to the practice of clinical laboratory science. This is the first course in a series of two clinical hematology courses in the program.

Course content: This course picks up where MT 401 leaves off on the topic of clinical and analytical correlations to the complete blood count and peripheral blood smear examination. From there the course covers in depth discussions on hematologic disorders, including: anemia and hemolytic anemia; additional types of anemia; etiology, pathophysiology, clinical findings, laboratory findings, and therapy. The next unit covers: nonmalignant disorders of leukocytes; hematopoietic neoplasms; classification, terminology, pathophysiology of neoplasms; and the laboratory’s role in diagnosis and therapy. The final unit is on: stem cell therapy; molecular studies of neoplastic disorders; flow cytometry; and cytogenetics. Interpretations of data, problem solving, and quality assurance in addition to other real world aspects of the clinical hematology laboratory are woven throughout the course.

CMT 413: Principles of Immunohematology I (1.5 cr.) Fall Semester

This is a 22.5 hour didactic course that provides the cognitive foundation required for students to competently apply clinical immunohematology principles to the practice of clinical laboratory science. This is the first course in a series of two immunohematology courses in the program.

This course picks up where MT 401 leaves off on the fundamental concepts of immuno-hematology and leads into the concepts of molecular biology as they relate to: red cell genotyping; the genetic basis of blood groups including blood group polymorphisms; the ABO blood group system; and serologic testing. The Rh blood group system is the next topic in this unit covering the detection of Rh antibodies and antigens and clinical considerations. The Landsteiner Wiener Blood Group systems are also studied.  The second unit covers the antiglobulin test including: the biochemical composition of antihuman globulin (AHG) reagents and differentiation between polyspecific and monospecific reagents and their purpose; principles of the indirect antiglobulin test and the direct antiglobulin test; and factors affecting the antiglobulin test including sources of error, modification techniques. The third unit is on blood group terminology and other blood groups. Interpretations of data, problem solving, and quality assurance in addition to other real world aspects of the clinical blood bank and transfusion laboratory are woven throughout the course.

CMT 414: Clinical Laboratory Microbiology I (2.5 cr.) Fall Semester

This is a 37.5 hour didactic course that provides the cognitive foundation required for students to competently apply the principles of clinical microbiology to the practice of clinical laboratory science. This is the first course in a series of two clinical microbiology courses in the program.

Course principles are presented in a situational learning model correlating clinical pathological findings with interpretations of data, problem solving, and quality assurance in addition to other real world aspects of the clinical microbiology laboratory. This course is a continuation of MT 401 and begins with the general principles of clinical bacteriology as they relate to: identification of gram positive and gram negative cocci; gram positive bacilli; gram negative bacilli and coccobacilli; gram negative cocci; anaerobic bacteriology. Correlations will be made to pathophysiology and diagnosis by organ systems, such as infections of the: bloodstream; lower respiratory system; upper respiratory tract; meninges, encephalitis and other central nervous system infections; urinary tract; genital tract; gastrointestinal tract; skin, soft tissue and wounds; otherwise sterile body fluids, bone marrow and solid tissues.

CMT 421: Clinical Chemistry II (2 cr.) Spring Semester

This is a 30 hour didactic course that provides the cognitive foundation required for students to competently apply clinical chemistry principles to the practice of clinical laboratory science. This is the second course in a series of two clinical chemistry courses in the program.

Clinical and analytical correlations are organized by organ system, including: the immune system; hypothalamic and pituitary functions; adrenal functions; gonadal functions; the thyroid gland; calcium hemostasis and hormonal regulation; liver function; cardiac function and laboratory markers for cardiac disease; pancreatic and gastrointestinal function, and body fluid analysis (amniotic fluid, cerebral spinal fluid, sweat, synovial and serous fluids). Therapeutic drug monitoring and drugs of abuse will also be included. The chemical principles of for assessment of organ systems functions are presented in a situational learning model that makes correlations: to disease states, interpretations of data, problem solving, and quality assurance in addition to other real world aspects of the clinical chemistry laboratory.

CMT 422: Clinical Hematology II (2 cr.) Spring Semester

This is a 30 hour didactic course that provides the cognitive foundation required for students to competently apply clinical hematology principles to the practice of clinical laboratory science. This is the second course in a series of two clinical hematology courses in the program.

The first unit of this course provides an in depth study of morphologic analysis of body fluids from a hematologic perspective, including: urine, serous, synovial, cerebral spinal fluid, semen analysis, and joint fluids.

The second unit covers primary hemostasis with discussions of the vascular system and platelets in hemostasis. Secondary hemostasis is also covered and includes an in-depth discussion of: the coagulation mechanism; procoagulant factors; the coagulation cascade; fibrinolytic system; and the control mechanisms of hemostasis.

The final unit for this course covers the disorders of primary hemostasis, including the following topics: diagnosis of bleeding disorders; disorders of the vascular system; and platelet disorders. Interpretations of data, problem solving, and quality assurance in addition to other real world aspects of the clinical hematology laboratory are integrated throughout the course content.

CMT 423: Principles of Immunohematology II (2 cr.) Spring Semester

This is a 30 hour didactic course that provides the cognitive foundation required for students to competently apply the scientific principles of immunohematology to the practice of clinical laboratory science. This is the second course in a series of two immunohematology courses in the program.

The first unit of this course begins with blood group terminology and leads into the detection and identification of antibodies in the clinical setting, including: the antibody screen; antibody detection; additional techniques for resolving antibody identification; direct antiglobulin techniques and elution methods; antibody titration and providing compatible blood products . Pretransfusion testing is also covered in relation to: compatibility testing protocols; selection of appropriate donor units; crossmatch testing; and pretransfusion testing in special circumstances.

The next unit is on donor screening and component preparation technique including: governing agencies; donor screening; whole blood collection; donor reactions; donor records and processing; component preparation; plasma derivatives; and transfusion practices of packed red blood cells and blood products.

Unit three is on the adverse effects of blood transfusion and covers: the risks of transfusion; regulations; acute transfusion reactions; delayed transfusion reactions; transfusion related adverse events in special patient scenarios including neonatal transfusions. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn; the HLA system and autoimmune hemolytic anemias are also covered here. Interpretations of data, problem solving, and quality assurance in addition to other real world aspects of the blood bank and transfusion medicine laboratory are integrated throughout the course content.

CMT 424: Clinical Laboratory Microbiology II (2.5 cr.) Spring Semester

This is a 37.5 hour didactic course that provides the cognitive foundation required for students to competently apply the principles of clinical microbiology to the practice of clinical laboratory science. This is the second course in a series of two clinical microbiology courses in the program.

This course begins with the general principles of clinical microbiology as they relate to laboratory techniques in the identification: of mycobacteria; parasitology; mycology; virology and other obligate intracellular and nonculturable bacterial agents; cell wall-deficient bacteria; spirochetes; serology of noninfectious clinical disorders; and serology of infectious clinical disorders. Correlations are made to pathophysiology and diagnosis by organ systems, such as infections of the: bloodstream; lower respiratory system; upper respiratory tract; meninges, encephalitis and other central nervous system infections; urinary tract; genital tract; gastrointestinal tract; skin, soft tissue and wounds; otherwise sterile body fluids, bone marrow and solid tissues.