Skip to main content
Explore URMC
menu
URMC / Education / Graduate Education / URBest Blog
 Transitioning From Academia To Industry

Transitioning From Academia To Industry

By Dr. Ninoshka Fernandes, Future Postdoctoral Associate for AbbVie

Summary For Planning Your Transition

  1. Take the time to determine where you have come from and where you are headed.
  2. Start early, build your network, do not be afraid to seek advice, and be open to other career options.
  3. Utilize all your resources and implement your plan, get feedback on your CV and cover letters, and create a strong LinkedIn profile.
  4. Use any opportunity that you can get to practice discussing your work, learn what works for you and what does not, and improve your skills.
  5. Everyone is unique so learn to only implement advice that works for you.

*the link above takes you to Dr. Fernandes's full news article.

URBEST Internship Primer

URBEST Internship Primer

News Article by Tracey Baas, URBEST Executive Director

Almost two years ago, I wrote an article called URBEST Internship Myths. I’d like to think it helped a number of trainees maneuver through setting up their internships. I also know that a number of people are still confused about how to think about URBEST internships, either because they are new to the URBEST Program, their department had a recent turnover of a key program coordinator or director who had previously worked with a URBEST intern (i.e. institutional memory loss), or maybe I haven’t put enough words into print yet. To rectify that situation, I give you The Primer.

Give Postdocs some Slack to interact!

Give Postdocs some Slack to interact!

By Anthony M. Franchini, MLS(ASCP)CM Ph.D., out-going SMD co-chair; Melissa Polonenko, Ph.D., AUD(C), UR PDA Communications Representative; and Monica Javidnia, Ph.D., incoming SMD co-chair

In total, UR has just over 210 postdocs, approximately 140 of whom work in the School of Medicine and Dentistry throughout the basic research and clinical departments on campus. But how many of these postdocs know of each other or interact in any meaningful way? The inherent nature of a postdoc complicates this matter immediately: postdocs arrive every month in small numbers, and are expected to dive right into their research in order to create their respective career paths to independence. The average length of a postdoc appointment sits between one and two years, the length of most master’s degree programs. Speaking from our collective experience, this usually leaves little time for social events, on-campus service, or down time. The UR Postdoctoral Association began to wonder: how can we foster and expand interaction between postdocs without cutting into their research time?  

Being Brave – How Stepping Outside Your Comfort Zone Can Increase Developmental Opportunities and Improve Team Performance

Being Brave – How Stepping Outside Your Comfort Zone Can Increase Developmental Opportunities and Improve Team Performance

By Ken Sims, MS, PhD Candidate in Translational Biomedical Science

“Be brave. Someone has to take advantage of this opportunity. Someone will receive the award, get the nomination, complete the internship, or participate in the workshop. Why not you?”

I have heard different versions of this paraphrased message multiple times over during my participation in the URBEST program. It is still as thought-provoking and inspiring to me today as the first time I heard it a few years ago. Most importantly, though, it is true.

Offsite Internship Experience at Estee Lauder Companies Inc.

Offsite Internship Experience at Estee Lauder Companies Inc.

By Hong Zhu, PhD Candidate in Biochemistry

I am a biochemistry PhD student by day and a TEAM (technical entrepreneur and management) master student by night, since most of the business classes takes place in the evening. With my PI’s consent and support, I sought an internship opportunity that could engage my interests in both science and business. Last semester, I had the opportunity to participate in an offsite internship for the Basic Science Research and Advanced Technologies group in Estee Lauder Companies Inc (ELC). I met Kurt Schilling, Senior Vice President of Basic Science Research and Advanced Technologies for ELC in a networking event organized by URBEST. Since I was the first graduate student intern in the group he leads, we had several phone conversations to pin down the details of this internship. We talked about what this internship could entail in order to achieve his group’s aims as well as my aims. Based on our discussion, Kurt proposed a project in which I would be able to put both my science training and business training into practice, which I happily accepted.