Research Meetings
February through March 2016


February 22, 2016 ( Monday )

12:00pm
Department of Biology Donut Talk

Dr. Hannah Seidel, University of Wisconsin-Madison

"Nutritional control of germline stem cells in C. elegans"

Location:  Lander Auditorium - Hutchison 140

Posted by:  Brenna Rybak, Biology, 6-Jan-16 8:58am ET


12:30pm - 1:30pm
Center for Oral Biology Presents… Faculty Candidate Seminar

Katherine Fantauzzo, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow

Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

" Two sides of the same face: PDGF receptors in the neural crest "


Location:  COB Conference Room, G9654, KMRB

Posted by:  Nicole Beaumont, Center for Oral Biology, 11-Feb-16 12:30pm ET


February 23, 2016 ( Tuesday )

9:30am - 11:00am
Center for Oral Biology Presents… Faculty Candidate Chalk Talk

Katherine Fantauzzo, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow

Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

" Two sides of the same face: PDGF receptors in the neural crest - CHALK TALK


Location:  COB Conference Room, G9654, KMRB

Posted by:  Nicole Beaumont, Center for Oral Biology, 11-Feb-16 12:33pm ET


February 24, 2016 ( Wednesday )

4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Aab CVRI Seminar Series

Speaker: Robert Stanley Freeman, Ph.D. Professor – Department of Pharmacology and Physiology University of Rochester Medical Center School of Medicine and Dentistry

Title of Talk: TBD

Location:  CVRI Conf. Room # G.11211/G.11213 (Ground Floor in the MRBX – Del Monte building) Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute

Posted by:  Jacqueline Velazquez, Cardiovascular Research Institute, 4-Feb-16 2:41pm ET


February 25, 2016 ( Thursday )

3:30pm
Department of Biology Donut Talk

Dr. Daniel Bergstralh, University of Cambridge

"Keeping It Together: How Division and Reintegration Ensure Epithelial Integrity"

Location:  Lander Auditorium - Hutchison 140

Posted by:  Brenna Rybak, Biology, 25-Jan-16 1:30pm ET


February 26, 2016 ( Friday )

12:00pm - 1:00pm
Pediatric Biomedical & Translational Research Seminar

Aaron Hamvas, MD, Raymond and Hazel Speck Barry Professor of Neonatology, Head, Division of Neonatology at the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago/Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine will be speaking on "The expanding phenotypic spectrum of surfactant dysfunction mutations."

Location:  2-6408 (K207)

Posted by:  Patricia Klein, Pediatrics, 18-Jan-16 3:03pm ET


February 29, 2016 ( Monday )

12:00pm - 1:00pm
Microbiology and Immunology Department Seminar

Paul Jensen, Ph.D. Research Assistant Professor University of Illinois

"Antibiotic discovery with genome-scale models"

Host: Robert Quivey

Monday, February 29, 2016 12:00-1:00 PM Upper Auditorium (Room 3-7619)

Seminar Abstract: The rise of antibiotic resistance has ushered in the "post-antibiotic" era, where we lack any drugs to treat some of the deadliest pathogens. Regaining the upper hand against drug-resistant bacteria requires a rapid, low-cost pipeline for discovering new antibiotics. Dr. Jensen will describe new methods for combining genome-scale metabolic models and high-throughput experiments to identify novel antibiotic therapies. Examples will include drug repurposing, combination screening, and strain-specific drug targeting.

Location:  Upper Auditorium (3-7619)

Posted by:  Brenda Knorr, Micro & Immunolgy, 2-Feb-16 12:09pm ET


March 2, 2016 ( Wednesday )

4:00pm - 5:00pm
Aab CVRI Seminar Series

SPEAKER: J. Geoffrey Pickering. Md, PhD, Robarts Research Institute

TITLE: TBD (Smooth muscle cell motility)

LOCATION: CVRI Conf. Room # G.11211/G.11213 (Ground Floor in the MRBX – Del Monte building) Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute

Posted by:  Jacqueline Velazquez, Cardiovascular Research Institute, 4-Feb-16 2:32pm ET


March 7, 2016 ( Monday )

12:00pm - 1:00pm
Microbiology and Immunology Department Seminar

Luis Sigal, D.V.M.,Ph.D. Professor, Thomas Jefferson University Department of Microbiology and Immunology

"Anti-viral protection by memory CD8 T-cells"

Host: Brian Ward

Monday, March 7, 2016 12:00-1:00 PM Upper Auditorium (Room 3-7619)

Seminar Abstract: Major efforts have been made to develop anti-viral and anti-tumor vaccines relying on memory CD8 T-cells. Unfortunately, no CD8 T-cell vaccine has yet been successful in the clinic, perhaps because we have an incomplete understanding of the requirements for protective CD8 T-cell memory. For the past few years, my laboratory has been working with the agent of mousepox ectromelia virus (ECTV), an Orthopoxvirus (OPV) very similar to the virus of human smallpox variola virus, and to the smallpox vaccine vaccinia virus. A major area of our research has been to use ECTV as a model to understand how vaccines protect from an acute viral infection in its natural host. During my seminar I will present published and unpublished data that provide major insights on how memory CD8 T-cells protect from this highly lethal viral infection.

Location:  Upper Auditorium (3-7619)

Posted by:  Brenda Knorr, Micro & Immunolgy, 2-Feb-16 12:24pm ET


March 9, 2016 ( Wednesday )

4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Aab CVRI Seminar Series

Speaker: Gadiparthi N. Rao, Ph.D. Distinguished Professor The University of Tennesse Health Science Center

Title Of Talk: Vascular remodeling (tentative)

Location:  CVRI Conf. Room # G.11211/G.11213 (Ground Floor in the MRBX – Del Monte building) Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute

Posted by:  Jacqueline Velazquez, Cardiovascular Research Institute, 4-Feb-16 2:36pm ET


March 18, 2016 ( Friday )

3:00pm - 4:00pm
Department of Biology EEB Seminar

Mary Grantham, University of Rochester

TBA

Location:  Hutchison 316

Posted by:  Deborah Lawrence, Biology, 26-Jan-16 1:28pm ET


March 23, 2016 ( Wednesday )

4:00pm - 5:00pm
Aab CVRI Seminar Series

SPEAKER: Rosemary Akhurst, PhD, UC San Francisco

TITLE: TGF/BMP signaling pathway (tentative)

LOCATION: 3-7619 Upper Auditorium

Posted by:  Jacqueline Velazquez, Cardiovascular Research Institute, 15-Sep-15 8:39am ET


March 25, 2016 ( Friday )

3:00pm - 4:00pm
Department of Biology EEB Seminar

Emerson Khost, University of Rochester

TBA

Location:  Hutchison 316

Posted by:  Deborah Lawrence, Biology, 26-Jan-16 1:32pm ET


March 28, 2016 ( Monday )

12:00pm - 1:00pm
Microbiology and Immunology Department Seminar

Vijay Kuchroo, Ph.D. Samuel L. Wasserstrom Professor of Neurology, Director of Evergrande Center for Immunologic Diseases, Brigham and Woman¡¦s Hospital Center for Neurological Diseases

Transcriptional networks that regulate development of Tregs & Th17 cells

Research Abstract: Recently a subset of interleukin (IL)-17-producing T cells (TH17) distinct from TH1 or TH2 cells was described and shown to have a crucial role in the induction of autoimmune tissue injury. In contrast to the effector T cells, CD4+CD25+, Fox-P3+ regulatory T cells (T-regs) inhibit autoimmunity and protect against tissue inflammation. TGF-ƒÒƒ¡ is a critical differentiation factor for the generation of T-regs and using Foxp3-GFP ¡§knock-in¡¨ mice we have shown that IL-6, an acute phase protein induced during infection, inflammation and injury inhibits the generation of Foxp3+ T-reg cells and induces proinflammatory Th17 cells (Bettelli et al., 2006). Our data therefore suggests a reciprocal relationship in the generation of pathogenic (Th17) T cells that induce autoimmunity and regulatory (Foxp3+) T cells that inhibit autoimmune tissue injury. Accumulating data suggests that there are three distinct steps in Th17 differentiation: Induction, Amplification and Stabilization mediated by distinct cytokines and loss of any of the cytokines (TGF-b, IL-6, IL-21 or IL-23) in the pathway results in a defect in generation of Th17 (Korn et al., 2009). However not all Th17 cells are pathogenic and induce autoimmunity, IL-23 is a key cytokine that induces pathogenicity in Th17 cells (Lee et al., 2012). Using expression profiling at very high temporal resolution, novel computational algorithms and innovative nano-wire based ¡§knock-down¡¨ approaches, we have developed a regulatory network that governs the development of Th17 cells. The Th17 transcriptional network consists of two self-enforcing but mutually antagonistic modules, which are essential for maintaining a balance between Th17 and other CD4 T cell subsets including Tregs (Yosef et al. 2013, Wu et al., 2013). In addition to high-density temporal microarray analysis, we have performed single-cell RNA-seq of Th17 cells in order to characterize cellular heterogeneity, identify subpopulations, functional states and learn how gene expression variation affects Th17 effector functions. We have identified novel regulators of Th17 cells both in vivo and in vitro that do not affect Th17 differentiation but affect pathogenic vs. non-pathogenic functional states of Th17 cells.

Location:  Upper Auditorium (3-7619)

Posted by:  Brenda Knorr, Micro & Immunolgy, 28-Aug-15 11:57am ET


12:00pm - 1:00pm
Microbiology and Immunology Department Seminar

Vijay Kuchroo, Ph.D. Samuel L. Wasserstrom Professor of Neurology Director of Evergrande Center for Immunologic Diseases Brigham and Women's Hospital Center for Neurological Diseases ¡§Transcriptional networks that regulate development of Tregs & Th17 cells¡¨

Host: Tim Mosmann

Monday, March 28, 2016 12:00-1:00 PM Upper Auditorium (Room 3-7619)

Seminar Abstract: Recently a subset of interleukin (IL)-17-producing T cells (TH17) distinct from TH1 or TH2 cells was described and shown to have a crucial role in the induction of autoimmune tissue injury. In contrast to the effector T cells, CD4+CD25+, Fox-P3+ regulatory T cells (T-regs) inhibit autoimmunity and protect against tissue inflammation. TGF-ƒÒƒ¡ is a critical differentiation factor for the generation of T-regs and using Foxp3-GFP ¡§knock-in¡¨ mice we have shown that IL-6, an acute phase protein induced during infection, inflammation and injury inhibits the generation of Foxp3+ T-reg cells and induces proinflammatory Th17 cells (Bettelli et al., 2006). Our data therefore suggests a reciprocal relationship in the generation of pathogenic (Th17) T cells that induce autoimmunity and regulatory (Foxp3+) T cells that inhibit autoimmune tissue injury. Accumulating data suggests that there are three distinct steps in Th17 differentiation: Induction, Amplification and Stabilization mediated by distinct cytokines and loss of any of the cytokines (TGF-b, IL-6, IL-21 or IL-23) in the pathway results in a defect in generation of Th17 (Korn et al., 2009). However not all Th17 cells are pathogenic and induce autoimmunity, IL-23 is a key cytokine that induces pathogenicity in Th17 cells (Lee et al., 2012). Using expression profiling at very high temporal resolution, novel computational algorithms and innovative nano-wire based ¡§knock-down¡¨ approaches, we have developed a regulatory network that governs the development of Th17 cells. The Th17 transcriptional network consists of two self-enforcing but mutually antagonistic modules, which are essential for maintaining a balance between Th17 and other CD4 T cell subsets including Tregs (Yosef et al. 2013, Wu et al., 2013).

In addition to high-density temporal microarray analysis, we have performed single-cell RNA-seq of Th17 cells in order to characterize cellular heterogeneity, identify subpopulations, functional states and learn how gene expression variation affects Th17 effector functions. We have identified novel regulators of Th17 cells both in vivo and in vitro that do not affect Th17 differentiation but affect pathogenic vs. non-pathogenic functional states of Th17 cells.

Location:  Upper Auditorium (3-7619)

Posted by:  Brenda Knorr, Micro & Immunolgy, 2-Feb-16 1:01pm ET

 
 
http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/calendar/index.html