Skip to main content
menu
Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience / News & Events / Podcast: NeURoscience Perspectives

 

NeURoscience Perspectives

Neuroscience perspectives banner image

Listen today!

Join John Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester, in a conversation with world-renowned neuroscientists as they try to solve one of the most complex questions—how does the human brain work? Listen as they share their unique journeys to neuroscience research, lessons learned from the bench, and discoveries that transform our understanding of neurodevelopmental diseases and disorders like autism and Rett syndrome; and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

iTunes | Spotify | YouTube MusicGoogle Podcasts | Amazon Music | Castbox | iHeartRadio | RadioPublic | RSS

Episode 15: Fan Wang, PhD

<

How does the brain perceive touch? How does it process pain? Could what we know about pain better inform treatments for addiction? Fan Wang, PhD, professor in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences department at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT, joins John Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester for this engaging discussion in NeURoscience Perspectives. Hear her journey to research, how the focus of her lab has transformed over time, and how she is using role as a researcher to better the lives of others.

Episode 14: Lucina Uddin, PhD

<

What does the spontaneous activity in the brain tell us? How is open science changing research? Lucina Uddin, PhD, professor-in-residence of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at University of California, Los Angeles, joins John Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester for this engaging discussion in NeURoscience Perspectives. Hear her journey to research, how she’s taking on diversity and inclusion in the NIH funded largest long-term study of adolescent brain development (the ABCD Study), and her best advice for aspiring scientists.

Episode 13: Brian Boyd, PhD

How a paragraph in a textbook and a summer camp were pivotal to the career of Brian Boyd, PhD, William C. Friday Distinguished Professor of Education Interim Director of the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina (UNC). Boyd has dedicated his career to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). He trained in special education, and much of his research has involved developing and evaluating evidence-based practices for children with ASD in schools and at home. His recent work focuses on how implicit bias and race affect the outcomes of children with and without disabilities. He sat down with John J. Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester, on a visit to the Medical Center as one of the keynote speakers of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience and UR-IDDRC annual symposium.

Episode 12: Yoland Smith, PhD

What's puzzling researchers studying Parkinson’s disease? Yoland Smith, PhD, Division Chief, Neuropharmacology and Neurologic Diseases, Emory National Primate Research Center discusses this with John J. Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester. Smith seeks to understand the pathophysiology of Parkinson's and characterize changes in the synaptic plasticity of the basal ganglia in normal and pathological conditions. With more than 250 peer-reviewed manuscripts, Smith is a prolific published who is also a senior editor at the European Journal of Neuroscience. He is also passionate about mentorship and discusses why people should have a mentor throughout their careers.

Episode 11: Dean Salisbury, PhD

His research has helped to change the conceptualization of schizophrenia as a static, perinatal encephalopathy by pioneering the combined use of structural brain imaging and electroencephalographic (EEG) measurement of auditory cortex responses to demonstrate that progressive gray matter loss during the early disease course of schizophrenia is linked to progressive auditory impairment. Dean Salisbury, PhD, a professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh, sits down with John J. Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester, to discuss his latest research and what lead him to a career in science.

Episode 10: Katalin Gothard, MD, PhD

During her medical training, she worked in Romania orphanages. Today most of her research focuses on touch. Katalin Gothard, MD, PhD, a professor of Physiology and Neuroscience at the University of Arizona, studies the neural basis of emotion and social behavior. She tells John J. Foxe, PhD, the director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester, what she experienced with those children early in her career is never far from her mind.

Episode 9: Qiang Chang, PhD

Rett syndrome is a rare disease that impacts one out of every 10,000 female births. Qiang Chang, PhD, professor of Medical Genetics & Neurology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, studies this developmental disorder caused by mutations that deform an essential protein called MeCP2. He is also the director of the Waisman Center and leads the Intellectual and Developmental Research Center at UW-Madison. He tells John J. Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester, why it is important for scientists to keep an open mind.

Episode 8: Helen Barbas, PhD

She pursued research in the area of the brain others thought was “too complex to study.” Helen Barbas, PhD, a professor of Anatomy & Neurobiology at Boston University School of Medicine, is deemed a pioneer in the neuroanatomy of the primate brain, studying the prefrontal cortex. She started her lab, Neural Systems Laboratory, at BU in the 1980s and has made numerous contributions to our understanding of circuits in the prefrontal cortex in primates. She shares her journey to science with John J. Foxe, PhD, the director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester, which includes a Fulbright scholarship that brought a 17-year-old over five thousand miles from home.

Episode 7: Bea Luna, PhD

She was one of the first people to dedicate their research to the teenage brain. Bea Luna, PhD, a professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh, is known for conducting neuroimaging research on the development of cognitive control, reward, and reinforcement learning from early childhood to adolescence. She shares her journey from Chile to the U.S. as a teen, why she studies adolescent brain development, her time working in the White House, and reflects on being a woman and mother working in science during this episode of NeURoscience Perspectives with John J. Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester.

Episode 6: Tatiana Pasternak, PhD

The request for a scientific paper changed the course of a scientific career for a student in Lativa. Tatiana Pasternak, PhD, a Scientific Review Officer at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, spent more than 40 years as a Professor of Neuroscience and researcher at the University of Rochester she shares her research journey, including her connection to Ivan Pavlov, and what her most recent role as a Scientific Review Officer at the NINDS has taught her.

Episode 5: Ed Callaway, PhD

His lab pioneered a new way to map the connections between single neurons and specific cell types in the brain. Ed Callaway, PhD, professor, and Audrey Geisel chair in the systems neurobiology laboratories at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, shares why he believes there will eventually be gene therapy to treat brain disorders and the tool his lab developed using the rabies virus to understand connections between neurons in this episode of NeURoscience Perspectives, John J. Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester.

Episode 4: Jeffrey Macklis, MD

The term, stem cell has been misused when referencing the nervous system, according to Jeffrey Macklis, MD, Max and Anne Wien Professor of Life Sciences, in the Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology and Center for Brain Science at Harvard University. He discussed this with John Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester. Dr. Macklis is also professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery at Harvard Medical School. His lab seeks to apply developmental controls toward brain and spinal cord regeneration and directed differentiation for therapeutic and mechanistic screening.

Episode 3: David Amaral, PhD

How close are scientists to discovering a biomarker for autism? David Amaral, PhD, a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of California, Davis, and the Beneto Foundation Chair and Research Director of the MIND Institute, discusses this with John Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester. He also shares the statement he no longer uses in papers about autism and what that means for early intervention. As Research Director, he coordinates a multidisciplinary analysis of children with autism called the Autism Phenome Project to define clinically significant sub-types of autism. Dr. Amaral is the director of Autism BrainNet, a collaborative effort to solicit postmortem brain tissue to facilitate autism research.

Episode 2: Helen Tager-Flusberg, PhD

What can language tell us about the brain of someone with autism? Helen Tager-Flusberg, PhD, director and principal investigator at the Center for Autism Research Excellence - CARE at Boston University, has spent years researching language, communication, and associated social-cognitive deficits in autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. She joins John J. Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester, to discuss this relationship, and also offers some advice to young women pursuing a PhD in science.

Episode 1: Steven Petersen, PhD

How does reading change the brain? It is one area of research focus for the Petersen lab at Washington University in St. Louis. Steven Petersen, PhD, professor of Radiology, Psychological & Brain Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, and Neuroscience at Washington University joins John J. Foxe, PhD, director of the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester and shares his journey to science, thoughts on the research publication process, and discusses how his lab behavioral, functional neuroimaging (fMRI), and functional connectivity (fcMRI) to study the neural mechanisms underlying attention, language, learning, and memory.