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“An accurate diagnosis is the first step to receiving effective treatment.” – Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General

“An accurate diagnosis is the first step to receiving effective treatment.” – Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General

By Kimberly Burgos Villar, MS; PhD Candidate in the Pathology – Cell Biology of Disease Program

Clinical laboratory science is an essential service to anyone who seeks medical care; however, very few people think about what happens behind the scenes after a biological specimen has been collected. Every blood draw, drug test, swab, and biopsy are sent through an intricate network of laboratory procedures to find a long-awaited diagnosis for a patient. Frequently, these tests have life-long effects on patients and their families: early detection of cancer that can now be treated with a much higher success rate, finding out a new diabetes medication is finally able to manage blood sugar levels, and identifying a match for a donor heart that a patient has been waiting for are only a few examples.

"My Experience as a Science Communication Intern "

"My Experience as a Science Communication Intern "

By Ashley Peppriell, MS, PhD Candidate in Toxicology

An old adage in the field of toxicology explains that anything can be toxic, given the dose and duration of exposure. This message dates back to the 16th century, yet there is still misconception surrounding toxic substances in the environment. I think that most people are aware that pollution is bad, but may not fully understand the societal impacts of toxic exposures. More work needs to be done to communicate the risks of toxic exposures to the public.

"Following the cues: trusting your gut in science and life"

"Following the cues: trusting your gut in science and life"

By: Tara Capece, Ph.D., MPH -Scientific Review Officer with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

My career path as a graduate student began the way many do – with the belief I was going to stay in academia. I loved pouring over the literature and writing (and editing and re-editing…) papers and grant applications. I especially enjoyed brainstorming for the best questions and experiments for projects. I checked all the academic boxes, and my path was set. Until it wasn’t.